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Behind the Mask: Nurses, Their Unions and Nursing Policy

Behind the Mask: Nurses, Their Unions and Nursing Policy nursing stood little chance of general acceptan- within the nursing commu- nity" (p. 69). Rob van der Peet identifies observation, reflection, and training as Nightingale's requisite characteristics of-nursing. He suggests, therefore, that moral education was for her the major foundation of nursing education. Discipline became then the essence of training. He does nor discuss to what extent moral reasoning, moral education, and training were reflections of commonly held Victorian beliefs and values and not unique to Nightingale's religious pragmatism. Interestingly, van der Peet notes rhat, except for the religious connotations, Nightingdeas ideas of nursing education--obsema- tion, reflection, training-were similar to John Dewey's philosophy of educa- tion. The author examines the meaning and scope of Nightingale's model of nursing by comparing it with the current nursing paradigm of person, environ- ment, health, and nursing. He discusses Nightingale's dilemma with certain theological concepts, for example, free will and necessity. Finally he states that nursing may yet "draw upon those aspects of the Nightingale legacywhich still haw relevan- to modern nursing" (p. 82). Rob van der Peet accomplishes this in-depth analysis of Nightingale's concepts of nursing in an cvenhandcd, scholarly manner. A few additional definitions of his religious terms might be helpful http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Behind the Mask: Nurses, Their Unions and Nursing Policy

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 3 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.162
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

nursing stood little chance of general acceptan- within the nursing commu- nity" (p. 69). Rob van der Peet identifies observation, reflection, and training as Nightingale's requisite characteristics of-nursing. He suggests, therefore, that moral education was for her the major foundation of nursing education. Discipline became then the essence of training. He does nor discuss to what extent moral reasoning, moral education, and training were reflections of commonly held Victorian beliefs and values and not unique to Nightingale's religious pragmatism. Interestingly, van der Peet notes rhat, except for the religious connotations, Nightingdeas ideas of nursing education--obsema- tion, reflection, training-were similar to John Dewey's philosophy of educa- tion. The author examines the meaning and scope of Nightingale's model of nursing by comparing it with the current nursing paradigm of person, environ- ment, health, and nursing. He discusses Nightingale's dilemma with certain theological concepts, for example, free will and necessity. Finally he states that nursing may yet "draw upon those aspects of the Nightingale legacywhich still haw relevan- to modern nursing" (p. 82). Rob van der Peet accomplishes this in-depth analysis of Nightingale's concepts of nursing in an cvenhandcd, scholarly manner. A few additional definitions of his religious terms might be helpful

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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