Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Balancing Work and Family in an Aging Society: The Canadian Experience

Balancing Work and Family in an Aging Society: The Canadian Experience CHAPTERS Balancing Work and Family in an Aging Society: The Canadian Experience ANNE MARTIN MATTHEWS DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH CAROLYN J. ROSENTHAL DEPARTMENT OF REHABLLITATIVE MEDICINE AND CENTRE FOR STIJDIES OF AOiNG UNIVERSITY OF TORQl'ITO The social roles that have primacy in the lives of most individuals in modem industrial societies are the kinship role and the work role . Throughout the indi­ vidual life course, the staging of these roles may be simultaneous or sequential (Voydanoff. 1989). In simultaneous staging individuals perform both work and kinship roles during the adult life course. In conlrast, sequential staging involves shifting the extent of participation in work and kinship roles across stages in family and work careers. This chapter argues that, within the context of popu­ lation aging, recent changes in kinship structure and in patterns of both labor­ force participation and the structure of work have increased the likelihood of simultaneous and active involvement in work and family roles. At a structural level. the coexistence of these two roles is experienced differ­ en tly by members of different age cohorts, and by women and men. At the individual level, the processes of negotiating a balance between these http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

Balancing Work and Family in an Aging Society: The Canadian Experience

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/balancing-work-and-family-in-an-aging-society-the-canadian-experience-jIl8L8nmEA
Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.13.1.96
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHAPTERS Balancing Work and Family in an Aging Society: The Canadian Experience ANNE MARTIN MATTHEWS DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH CAROLYN J. ROSENTHAL DEPARTMENT OF REHABLLITATIVE MEDICINE AND CENTRE FOR STIJDIES OF AOiNG UNIVERSITY OF TORQl'ITO The social roles that have primacy in the lives of most individuals in modem industrial societies are the kinship role and the work role . Throughout the indi­ vidual life course, the staging of these roles may be simultaneous or sequential (Voydanoff. 1989). In simultaneous staging individuals perform both work and kinship roles during the adult life course. In conlrast, sequential staging involves shifting the extent of participation in work and kinship roles across stages in family and work careers. This chapter argues that, within the context of popu­ lation aging, recent changes in kinship structure and in patterns of both labor­ force participation and the structure of work have increased the likelihood of simultaneous and active involvement in work and family roles. At a structural level. the coexistence of these two roles is experienced differ­ en tly by members of different age cohorts, and by women and men. At the individual level, the processes of negotiating a balance between these

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1993

There are no references for this article.