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Babies Aren't Rationed: World War II and the Frontier Nursing Service

Babies Aren't Rationed: World War II and the Frontier Nursing Service Babies Aren’t Rationed: World War II and the Frontier Nursing Service Anne Z. Cockerham Frontier Nursing University Over the world the words fell . . . hushed, tense, silent — waiting about the radios in the far-off Kentucky mountains. First numbness. Then a rush of feel- ing: England, our England! We must go home! . . . Eighteen of the [service's] twenty-two nurse-midwives, from Great Britain; our source of supply closed; the call home sounded . . . As they heard of the fall of nations, nurse after nurse left us with regret. Introduction In September 1940, Frontier Nursing Service (FNS) Assistant Director Dorothy Buck told American Journal of Nursing readers about the toll that the war in Europe was taking on the FNS, a rural nurse-midwifery service in the remote eastern Kentucky mountains. Although thousands of miles separated the FNS from combat zones, the war-related midwife shortage contributed to the most significant crisis of the service’s fifteen-year history. As a case study of healthcare on the home front in one area of the United States during World War II, this article examines the professional, economic, and practical challenges that the FNS faced during the Second World War and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Babies Aren't Rationed: World War II and the Frontier Nursing Service

Nursing History Review , Volume 29 (1): 27 – Dec 24, 2020

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.29.23
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Babies Aren’t Rationed: World War II and the Frontier Nursing Service Anne Z. Cockerham Frontier Nursing University Over the world the words fell . . . hushed, tense, silent — waiting about the radios in the far-off Kentucky mountains. First numbness. Then a rush of feel- ing: England, our England! We must go home! . . . Eighteen of the [service's] twenty-two nurse-midwives, from Great Britain; our source of supply closed; the call home sounded . . . As they heard of the fall of nations, nurse after nurse left us with regret. Introduction In September 1940, Frontier Nursing Service (FNS) Assistant Director Dorothy Buck told American Journal of Nursing readers about the toll that the war in Europe was taking on the FNS, a rural nurse-midwifery service in the remote eastern Kentucky mountains. Although thousands of miles separated the FNS from combat zones, the war-related midwife shortage contributed to the most significant crisis of the service’s fifteen-year history. As a case study of healthcare on the home front in one area of the United States during World War II, this article examines the professional, economic, and practical challenges that the FNS faced during the Second World War and

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Dec 24, 2020

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