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Attitudes toward Old Age and Elderly Persons

Attitudes toward Old Age and Elderly Persons Attitudes toward Old Age and Elderly Persons Attitude Research in Gerontology Because attitudes are thought to reflect the behavioral tendencies of their holders as well as a functionally si@cant social dimate, the study of attitudes toward old age and elderly persons has long promised to be a significant component of a social psychological perspective in gerontology (Atchley, 1977; Bengston, 1973; Bennett and Eckman, 1973; Bnibaker and Powers, 1976; Hendricks and Hendricks, 1977; Lowenthal, 1977; Nardi, 1973; Ward, 1979). Beginning, primarily, with two series of classic studies conducted by Tuckman and Lorge (e.g., 1953a, 1953b, 1958) and Kogan and his associates (Golde and Kogan, 1959; Kogan, 1961a, 1961b; Kogan and Sbelton, 1962a, 1962b), attitude researchers have sought to develop appropriate techniques to assess attitudes toward old age and elderly persons and to investigate typical attitude content and structure, individual and group differences in views of old age and old people, and explanatory and consequential correlates of these attitudes (e.g., McTavish, 1971). While past research on these topics has not been at all conclusive (Brubaker and Powers, 1976; McTavish, 1971 ), widely read papers and reviews have been taken as documenting the existence of negative and stereotypic perceptions of elderly persons http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

Attitudes toward Old Age and Elderly Persons

Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics , Volume 1 (1): 50 – Sep 1, 1980

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.1.1.287
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Attitudes toward Old Age and Elderly Persons Attitude Research in Gerontology Because attitudes are thought to reflect the behavioral tendencies of their holders as well as a functionally si@cant social dimate, the study of attitudes toward old age and elderly persons has long promised to be a significant component of a social psychological perspective in gerontology (Atchley, 1977; Bengston, 1973; Bennett and Eckman, 1973; Bnibaker and Powers, 1976; Hendricks and Hendricks, 1977; Lowenthal, 1977; Nardi, 1973; Ward, 1979). Beginning, primarily, with two series of classic studies conducted by Tuckman and Lorge (e.g., 1953a, 1953b, 1958) and Kogan and his associates (Golde and Kogan, 1959; Kogan, 1961a, 1961b; Kogan and Sbelton, 1962a, 1962b), attitude researchers have sought to develop appropriate techniques to assess attitudes toward old age and elderly persons and to investigate typical attitude content and structure, individual and group differences in views of old age and old people, and explanatory and consequential correlates of these attitudes (e.g., McTavish, 1971). While past research on these topics has not been at all conclusive (Brubaker and Powers, 1976; McTavish, 1971 ), widely read papers and reviews have been taken as documenting the existence of negative and stereotypic perceptions of elderly persons

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1980

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