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Asylum Nursing and Institutional Service: A Case Study of the South of England, 1861–1881

Asylum Nursing and Institutional Service: A Case Study of the South of England, 1861–1881 Asylum Nursing and Institutional Service A Case Study of the South of England, 186 1-1 88 1 DAVID WRIGHT School of Nursing University of Nottingham Domestic service holds a central place in the history of England's industrial revolution. National studies have illustrated how thousands of young women from poor rural families migrated to take positions as servants in upwardly mobile middle-class households, forming a pivotal occupational group in the cities and an important link between rurd and urban life.' Within British historiography, researchers have explored many dimensions of the relationship between the employing household and these working-class women, induding servants as an indicator of the social status of the employing family, the transmission of middle-class ideologies of respectability, and demographic studies of servant-employing households enumerated in the Victorian cen- suses. Once a neglected area ofeconomic history, domestic service now receives appropriate attention as the largest occupational group for women's waged work in the nineteenth ccnturyB2 Institutional nursing has dso received considerable interest. Freeing itself from the hegemony of traditional medical history, recent monographs have explored in subtle and complex ways issues surrounding profcssiomIization, identity, and the sexual division of medical labor? However, the interface between private domestic service and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Asylum Nursing and Institutional Service: A Case Study of the South of England, 1861–1881

Nursing History Review , Volume 7 (1): 17 – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.7.1.153
Publisher site
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Abstract

Asylum Nursing and Institutional Service A Case Study of the South of England, 186 1-1 88 1 DAVID WRIGHT School of Nursing University of Nottingham Domestic service holds a central place in the history of England's industrial revolution. National studies have illustrated how thousands of young women from poor rural families migrated to take positions as servants in upwardly mobile middle-class households, forming a pivotal occupational group in the cities and an important link between rurd and urban life.' Within British historiography, researchers have explored many dimensions of the relationship between the employing household and these working-class women, induding servants as an indicator of the social status of the employing family, the transmission of middle-class ideologies of respectability, and demographic studies of servant-employing households enumerated in the Victorian cen- suses. Once a neglected area ofeconomic history, domestic service now receives appropriate attention as the largest occupational group for women's waged work in the nineteenth ccnturyB2 Institutional nursing has dso received considerable interest. Freeing itself from the hegemony of traditional medical history, recent monographs have explored in subtle and complex ways issues surrounding profcssiomIization, identity, and the sexual division of medical labor? However, the interface between private domestic service and

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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