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Articles: “Strange Young Women on Errands”: Obstetric Nursing Between Two Worlds

Articles: “Strange Young Women on Errands”: Obstetric Nursing Between Two Worlds ARTICLES "Strange Young Women on Errands" 0 bstetric Nursing Between Two Worlds1 Department of History of Medicine University of Wisconsin-Madison Today when most American women deliver their babies in the hospital, ebey can predict and even help to shape the patterns of care they receive from their nurses and physicians. But many of rhe first generation ofwomen to give birrh in che hospital-fxom the 1930s into the 1950Ad not find that the hospital met their needs and expectations. Some complained bitterly that they did not feel welcome in this new institutional setting, blaming both nurses and physicians for their feelings of alienation. One woman wrote that she felt *alone among strangersm in the hospital; another remembered that "No one kind reassuring word was spoken by nurse or doa~r."~ Birching women sometimes heaped their harshest judgments on their nurses. Ann Rivington's story of her 1933 confinement in a city hospital pointedly focused the brunt of her ire upon her nurses: I went them with no false expectations of Iurq or ddliw with no foad hopes of tase or comfort wen, But a ccrrain adeqwte mihum ofcare I did consider myright.., [Iwas] lcfclyingintheem-mm .... Thenuwwre-andd toevcryontonrhtd ... Wewereallchdwirhamad~rogct awaYas Six years http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Articles: “Strange Young Women on Errands”: Obstetric Nursing Between Two Worlds

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 22 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ARTICLES "Strange Young Women on Errands" 0 bstetric Nursing Between Two Worlds1 Department of History of Medicine University of Wisconsin-Madison Today when most American women deliver their babies in the hospital, ebey can predict and even help to shape the patterns of care they receive from their nurses and physicians. But many of rhe first generation ofwomen to give birrh in che hospital-fxom the 1930s into the 1950Ad not find that the hospital met their needs and expectations. Some complained bitterly that they did not feel welcome in this new institutional setting, blaming both nurses and physicians for their feelings of alienation. One woman wrote that she felt *alone among strangersm in the hospital; another remembered that "No one kind reassuring word was spoken by nurse or doa~r."~ Birching women sometimes heaped their harshest judgments on their nurses. Ann Rivington's story of her 1933 confinement in a city hospital pointedly focused the brunt of her ire upon her nurses: I went them with no false expectations of Iurq or ddliw with no foad hopes of tase or comfort wen, But a ccrrain adeqwte mihum ofcare I did consider myright.., [Iwas] lcfclyingintheem-mm .... Thenuwwre-andd toevcryontonrhtd ... Wewereallchdwirhamad~rogct awaYas Six years

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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