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Articles: “Making the Best of Things”: Technology in American Nursing, 1870–1940

Articles: “Making the Best of Things”: Technology in American Nursing, 1870–1940 ARTICLES "Making the Best of Things" Technology in American Nursing, 1870-1940 MA~RGARETB SANDBLOWSKI School of Nursing Univenity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill It has become commonplace in contemporary nursing literature to de- scribe, laud, or lament the impact of techn01ogy on nursing.' Whether ap- pearing as thc main subject matter of a tcxt or only in a passing reference, techohm is ugualfiy depicted as a critical and explanatory went in nursing btory. The efFect of this is to divide nursing history into two periods: (I) befbre World War II and (2) after, with the iacorporation. of4'high" or "modern" technology, such as vital function monitoring and assisted ven- tilation systems. Thc implication hcrc is either that there was no &ol- o%y in nursing before the advent of critical or intenshe care nursing, or that the impact on nursing ofwhatever technology existed before the 1960s was essentially unremarkable. Julie Fairman found that nurses who worked in the first special care units in the late 1950s did not think dfamdiar equip- mat, such as sphygmomanomctcrs, chest tubes, tracheotomy tubes, and catheters as teh01ogy, but rather reserved this term for such new devices as didysh machines and cardiac rn~nitors.~ Feminist critics of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Articles: “Making the Best of Things”: Technology in American Nursing, 1870–1940

Nursing History Review , Volume 5 (1): 20 – Jan 1, 1997

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.5.1.3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ARTICLES "Making the Best of Things" Technology in American Nursing, 1870-1940 MA~RGARETB SANDBLOWSKI School of Nursing Univenity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill It has become commonplace in contemporary nursing literature to de- scribe, laud, or lament the impact of techn01ogy on nursing.' Whether ap- pearing as thc main subject matter of a tcxt or only in a passing reference, techohm is ugualfiy depicted as a critical and explanatory went in nursing btory. The efFect of this is to divide nursing history into two periods: (I) befbre World War II and (2) after, with the iacorporation. of4'high" or "modern" technology, such as vital function monitoring and assisted ven- tilation systems. Thc implication hcrc is either that there was no &ol- o%y in nursing before the advent of critical or intenshe care nursing, or that the impact on nursing ofwhatever technology existed before the 1960s was essentially unremarkable. Julie Fairman found that nurses who worked in the first special care units in the late 1950s did not think dfamdiar equip- mat, such as sphygmomanomctcrs, chest tubes, tracheotomy tubes, and catheters as teh01ogy, but rather reserved this term for such new devices as didysh machines and cardiac rn~nitors.~ Feminist critics of

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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