Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

An Analysis of Nigerian Igbo Women's Petitions to U.S. Missionary Nurses in 1965

An Analysis of Nigerian Igbo Women's Petitions to U.S. Missionary Nurses in 1965 An Analysis of Nigerian Igbo Women’s Petitions to U.S. Missionary Nurses in 1965 Martha E. Farrar Highfield California State University, Northridge In May 1965, rural Igbo women welcomed two missionary nurses into their West African villages with salutations and songs. The women did not gather merely to celebrate the nurses’ visit. Rather, they gathered to seize the oppor- tunity to be heard. In two petitionary letters they established an understand- ing of the relationship between the Igbo people and the missionary nurses as a partnership with mutual rights and obligations. They also publicly expressed the material benefits they expected from the Church of Christ (COC) mission that the nurses represented. One of the missionary nurses preserved these let- ters in her private collection. Both letters provide a rare glimpse into how these Igbo women exercised their agency using the existing traditions of collective action, domestic power, and petitioning. The women positioned themselves as central figures in the Igbo- missionary story, adding their voices to a larger Igbo appeal to bring jobs and healthcare to their people. This article examines the letters’ context and con- tent, and documents the missionaries’ response. Significance Petitions were neither new nor unique to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

An Analysis of Nigerian Igbo Women's Petitions to U.S. Missionary Nurses in 1965

Nursing History Review , Volume 30 (1): 16 – Jan 28, 2022

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/an-analysis-of-nigerian-igbo-women-s-petitions-to-u-s-missionary-fPlwv46QRC
Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2022 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.30.133
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An Analysis of Nigerian Igbo Women’s Petitions to U.S. Missionary Nurses in 1965 Martha E. Farrar Highfield California State University, Northridge In May 1965, rural Igbo women welcomed two missionary nurses into their West African villages with salutations and songs. The women did not gather merely to celebrate the nurses’ visit. Rather, they gathered to seize the oppor- tunity to be heard. In two petitionary letters they established an understand- ing of the relationship between the Igbo people and the missionary nurses as a partnership with mutual rights and obligations. They also publicly expressed the material benefits they expected from the Church of Christ (COC) mission that the nurses represented. One of the missionary nurses preserved these let- ters in her private collection. Both letters provide a rare glimpse into how these Igbo women exercised their agency using the existing traditions of collective action, domestic power, and petitioning. The women positioned themselves as central figures in the Igbo- missionary story, adding their voices to a larger Igbo appeal to bring jobs and healthcare to their people. This article examines the letters’ context and con- tent, and documents the missionaries’ response. Significance Petitions were neither new nor unique to the

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 28, 2022

There are no references for this article.