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American Medicine and the Public Interest: A History of Specialization

American Medicine and the Public Interest: A History of Specialization BOOK REVIEWS American Medicine and the Public Interest: A History of Specialization By Rosemary Stevens (Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1998) Rosemary Stevens's pathbreaking 1971 study of medical specialization and its consequences for health care and public policy in the United States has been republished by the University of California Press with a new introduction and updated bibliography. The reappearance of the work is welcome. Carefully and prodigiously researched, it is an indispensable reference which offers a rich and detailed account-54! pages worth-of the "specialized, disorganized, expan­ sionary, and flamboyant" (p. 9) American medical profession in the first seven decades of this century. And, save for "confident predictions that national health insurance was around the corner" (p. 19), Stevens's assessment of the profession and the private, entrepreneurial culture which sustained it, are as insightful and helpful today as they were nearly 30 years ago. The introduction to the updated edition has utility as well. Here Stevens reviews recent scholarship in the medical profession, medical institutions, and the politics of health care in America, evaluates her work in light of it, and underscores the continuing relevance of the query at the heart of American Medicine and the Public Interest: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

American Medicine and the Public Interest: A History of Specialization

Nursing History Review , Volume 8 (1): 2 – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.8.1.185
Publisher site
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS American Medicine and the Public Interest: A History of Specialization By Rosemary Stevens (Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1998) Rosemary Stevens's pathbreaking 1971 study of medical specialization and its consequences for health care and public policy in the United States has been republished by the University of California Press with a new introduction and updated bibliography. The reappearance of the work is welcome. Carefully and prodigiously researched, it is an indispensable reference which offers a rich and detailed account-54! pages worth-of the "specialized, disorganized, expan­ sionary, and flamboyant" (p. 9) American medical profession in the first seven decades of this century. And, save for "confident predictions that national health insurance was around the corner" (p. 19), Stevens's assessment of the profession and the private, entrepreneurial culture which sustained it, are as insightful and helpful today as they were nearly 30 years ago. The introduction to the updated edition has utility as well. Here Stevens reviews recent scholarship in the medical profession, medical institutions, and the politics of health care in America, evaluates her work in light of it, and underscores the continuing relevance of the query at the heart of American Medicine and the Public Interest:

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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