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All My Babies: A Midwife's Own Story, by Georgia Department of Public Health, Medical Audio-Visual Institute of the Association of American Medical Colleges, and Education for Childbirth: Labor & Childbirth, by Medical Films, Inc.

All My Babies: A Midwife's Own Story, by Georgia Department of Public Health, Medical... ID:p0050ID:p0055ID:p0060 AllMyBabies:AMidwife’sOwnStory.1952.GeorgiaDepartmentofPublic Health,MedicalAudio-VisualInstituteof theAssociationofAmericanMedical Colleges.Producer:GeorgeC.Stoney;Director:GeorgeC.Stoney.($19.95, Amazon.com.Alsoavailableathttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I2djFnp 5h0w) EducationforChildbirth:Labor&Childbirth.1950.MedicalFilms,Inc. Producer:Photo&SoundProductions,SanFrancisco;Director:D.M.Hatfield. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Bwmv4fenDo) HighmaternalandinfantmortalityratesintheUnitedStatesintheearly20th century placed maternity care at the forefront of social reform efforts. Subse- quent improvements in childbirth outcomes were slow in Southeastern states particularly among rural African American women. Traditional black mid- wives, who attended the majority of births in rural American Southern com- munities,wereblamedforthehighratesofmaternalandinfantmortality.The twofilms, AllMyBabies:AMidwife’sOwnStory andEducationforChildbirth: Labor and Childbirth, feature Southern communities, and reflect the changes that were taking place worldwide as hospitals and physicians became central inapreviouslymidwife-led,home-basedexperience. The 1951 teaching film All My Babies covers 118 teaching points for traditional black midwives, through the example and work of Mary Coley, an experienced black midwife who attended births in rural Albany, Georgia fromthe1930stothe1960s.Conversely,EducationforChildbirth:Laborand Childbirth was produced in 1950 to provide education for expectant women, typically white, planning to give birth in the hospital. Together these films highlight the changes in maternity care that took place in the United States inthemid-20thcentury:movingfrommidwivestophysicians,fromhometo hospital, and from a focus on the mother and her labor to the physician and hiswork. FilmmakerGeorgeStoneywrote,directed,andproducedAllmybabiesfor the Georgia Department of Public Health. Coley cares for two women, Ida and Marybelle, during pregnancy, labor, and birth.¹ Coley narrates the film, explaining the procedures mothers can expect at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

All My Babies: A Midwife's Own Story, by Georgia Department of Public Health, Medical Audio-Visual Institute of the Association of American Medical Colleges, and Education for Childbirth: Labor & Childbirth, by Medical Films, Inc.

Nursing History Review , Volume 28 (1): 4 – Sep 19, 2019

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Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.28.203
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Abstract

ID:p0050ID:p0055ID:p0060 AllMyBabies:AMidwife’sOwnStory.1952.GeorgiaDepartmentofPublic Health,MedicalAudio-VisualInstituteof theAssociationofAmericanMedical Colleges.Producer:GeorgeC.Stoney;Director:GeorgeC.Stoney.($19.95, Amazon.com.Alsoavailableathttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I2djFnp 5h0w) EducationforChildbirth:Labor&Childbirth.1950.MedicalFilms,Inc. Producer:Photo&SoundProductions,SanFrancisco;Director:D.M.Hatfield. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Bwmv4fenDo) HighmaternalandinfantmortalityratesintheUnitedStatesintheearly20th century placed maternity care at the forefront of social reform efforts. Subse- quent improvements in childbirth outcomes were slow in Southeastern states particularly among rural African American women. Traditional black mid- wives, who attended the majority of births in rural American Southern com- munities,wereblamedforthehighratesofmaternalandinfantmortality.The twofilms, AllMyBabies:AMidwife’sOwnStory andEducationforChildbirth: Labor and Childbirth, feature Southern communities, and reflect the changes that were taking place worldwide as hospitals and physicians became central inapreviouslymidwife-led,home-basedexperience. The 1951 teaching film All My Babies covers 118 teaching points for traditional black midwives, through the example and work of Mary Coley, an experienced black midwife who attended births in rural Albany, Georgia fromthe1930stothe1960s.Conversely,EducationforChildbirth:Laborand Childbirth was produced in 1950 to provide education for expectant women, typically white, planning to give birth in the hospital. Together these films highlight the changes in maternity care that took place in the United States inthemid-20thcentury:movingfrommidwivestophysicians,fromhometo hospital, and from a focus on the mother and her labor to the physician and hiswork. FilmmakerGeorgeStoneywrote,directed,andproducedAllmybabiesfor the Georgia Department of Public Health. Coley cares for two women, Ida and Marybelle, during pregnancy, labor, and birth.¹ Coley narrates the film, explaining the procedures mothers can expect at

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 19, 2019

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