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Aging and the Public Health Workforce

Aging and the Public Health Workforce CHAPTER 6 Aging and the Public Health Workforce Jean Moore, Sandra McGinnis, and Tracey Continelli BACKGROUND The expected growth of the older adult population aged 65 years and older in the United States over the next 50 years will have an unprecedented im- pact on the country’s health care system as well as on its workforce. Caused by a confluence of two factors—declining birth rate and increasing life ex- pectancy—the aging of the U.S. population will have substantial impacts on both the supply of health care workers and the demand for health services. The supply of health care workers may decline as large numbers of them retire or reduce their working hours. At the same time, older adults consume a disproportionate share of health care services in the United States, so that demand for such services will increase. There are a number of important demographic trends related to this growing cohort of elderly. The cohort will • increase dramatically in number over the next 50 years, • be more racially and ethnically diverse than previous cohorts of older adults, • be better educated and less likely to be poor than in the past, • have a smaller pool of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.25.1.99
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHAPTER 6 Aging and the Public Health Workforce Jean Moore, Sandra McGinnis, and Tracey Continelli BACKGROUND The expected growth of the older adult population aged 65 years and older in the United States over the next 50 years will have an unprecedented im- pact on the country’s health care system as well as on its workforce. Caused by a confluence of two factors—declining birth rate and increasing life ex- pectancy—the aging of the U.S. population will have substantial impacts on both the supply of health care workers and the demand for health services. The supply of health care workers may decline as large numbers of them retire or reduce their working hours. At the same time, older adults consume a disproportionate share of health care services in the United States, so that demand for such services will increase. There are a number of important demographic trends related to this growing cohort of elderly. The cohort will • increase dramatically in number over the next 50 years, • be more racially and ethnically diverse than previous cohorts of older adults, • be better educated and less likely to be poor than in the past, • have a smaller pool of

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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