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Accommodation Requests: Who Is Asking for What?

Accommodation Requests: Who Is Asking for What? Purpose: Workplace accommodations are central to improving employment outcomes for people with and without disabilities; this study presents national estimates comparing accommodation requests and receipt as reported by individuals with and without disabilities. Method: Estimates are developed from the May 2012 Current Population Survey Disability Supplement. Results: The findings highlight variability in accommodation requests by disability type and status. Accommodation request rates are also presented by occupation and industry groups. Conclusions: As employers voice concerns about the additional burden of employing individuals with disabilities under new regulatory requirements, our findings highlight that 95% of individuals requesting an accommodation were people without disabilities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rehabilitation Research, Policy and Education Springer Publishing

Accommodation Requests: Who Is Asking for What?

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2021 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
2168-6653
eISSN
2168-6661
DOI
10.1891/2168-6653.28.4.329
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose: Workplace accommodations are central to improving employment outcomes for people with and without disabilities; this study presents national estimates comparing accommodation requests and receipt as reported by individuals with and without disabilities. Method: Estimates are developed from the May 2012 Current Population Survey Disability Supplement. Results: The findings highlight variability in accommodation requests by disability type and status. Accommodation request rates are also presented by occupation and industry groups. Conclusions: As employers voice concerns about the additional burden of employing individuals with disabilities under new regulatory requirements, our findings highlight that 95% of individuals requesting an accommodation were people without disabilities.

Journal

Rehabilitation Research, Policy and EducationSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2014

References