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A Strategic Framework for Action

A Strategic Framework for Action CHAPTER 2 A Strategic Framework for Action David W. DeLong Imagine an organization where highly skilled veteran employees and man- agers are routinely retiring or leaving their jobs, taking with them valuable knowledge that affects organizational performance. This pattern is obvious to every experienced manager. Yet employees don’t talk about it with senior management. Leadership continues to take pride in the company’s short-term performance and easily dismisses those who raise questions about the future and the difficulty of replacing those who are leaving. Yet the organization’s employees are smart. In the safety of their own departments they bemoan the loss of valuable colleagues and struggle to fill in the experiential knowledge that is gone. They know the organization is losing knowledge at an alarming rate, but no one dares to raise the issue to top management. What would leaders do about it anyway? Is this a fairytale? Unfortunately, no. This scenario has been all too com- mon in many organizations during the last decade. There has been a conspir- acy of silence about lost knowledge and its costs. Employees don’t speak up about it because they don’t think it will make any difference. And speaking up may actually be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

A Strategic Framework for Action

Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics , Volume 25 (1): 14 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.25.1.5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHAPTER 2 A Strategic Framework for Action David W. DeLong Imagine an organization where highly skilled veteran employees and man- agers are routinely retiring or leaving their jobs, taking with them valuable knowledge that affects organizational performance. This pattern is obvious to every experienced manager. Yet employees don’t talk about it with senior management. Leadership continues to take pride in the company’s short-term performance and easily dismisses those who raise questions about the future and the difficulty of replacing those who are leaving. Yet the organization’s employees are smart. In the safety of their own departments they bemoan the loss of valuable colleagues and struggle to fill in the experiential knowledge that is gone. They know the organization is losing knowledge at an alarming rate, but no one dares to raise the issue to top management. What would leaders do about it anyway? Is this a fairytale? Unfortunately, no. This scenario has been all too com- mon in many organizations during the last decade. There has been a conspir- acy of silence about lost knowledge and its costs. Employees don’t speak up about it because they don’t think it will make any difference. And speaking up may actually be

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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