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A Somewhat Duskier Skin: Mary Seacole in the Crimea

A Somewhat Duskier Skin: Mary Seacole in the Crimea "A Somewhat Duskier Skin": Mary Seacole in the Crimea Unsung Heroine The Crimean War of 1854 pve Florence Nighti+ the opportunity to escape the mundane life of an upper& Victorian lady by establishing a nursing contingent to care for the British sick and wounded. Thus, she started a revolution in "respectable" occupations op to women.' Little is known, however, of another woman, Mary Grant hole, who also tended the British casualties in thi cdlict. In fact, her role as a direct caregiver surpassed any such assistance given by rhc far-better-known Nightingale. This unsung heroine, Mary Seamle (nee Grant), was born in Kingston, Jamaica, probably in 1805, of mixed ethnic background.2 She belonged to a dass that was legaIly termed muh. Her father was an army officer from ScotIand who had been stationed on the island. Hex mother was a free bl& woman who ran a respd1e knt boding house patronized by British army and navy oficers and their families. In the early 19th century, Mary's mother's expertise in 'doctoring" was well known in Kingston. Thb fit well with the custom of the time for military personnel to seek treatment for diseases and wounds hm providers outside the army or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

A Somewhat Duskier Skin: Mary Seacole in the Crimea

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 13 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

"A Somewhat Duskier Skin": Mary Seacole in the Crimea Unsung Heroine The Crimean War of 1854 pve Florence Nighti+ the opportunity to escape the mundane life of an upper& Victorian lady by establishing a nursing contingent to care for the British sick and wounded. Thus, she started a revolution in "respectable" occupations op to women.' Little is known, however, of another woman, Mary Grant hole, who also tended the British casualties in thi cdlict. In fact, her role as a direct caregiver surpassed any such assistance given by rhc far-better-known Nightingale. This unsung heroine, Mary Seamle (nee Grant), was born in Kingston, Jamaica, probably in 1805, of mixed ethnic background.2 She belonged to a dass that was legaIly termed muh. Her father was an army officer from ScotIand who had been stationed on the island. Hex mother was a free bl& woman who ran a respd1e knt boding house patronized by British army and navy oficers and their families. In the early 19th century, Mary's mother's expertise in 'doctoring" was well known in Kingston. Thb fit well with the custom of the time for military personnel to seek treatment for diseases and wounds hm providers outside the army or

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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