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A Hard Day’s Work: Institutional Nursing in the Post-World War II Era

A Hard Day’s Work: Institutional Nursing in the Post-World War II Era A Hard Day's Work Institutional Nursing in the Post-World War II Era VICTORIA T. GRANDO The University of Missouri-Columbia Sinclair School of Nursing At che end of World War II the hospital industry in the United States was booming, driven largely by postwar prosperity and the dramatic rise in private health insurance plans. As money became increasingly available for health care, hospitals were .becoming centers of high technology, where more and more people went for surgery and acute care. Numerous factors precipitated in the elderly population, this new demand for services including an increase a high postwar birth rate, and numerous disabled veterans needingservices . At the same time, institutional nursing faced numerous challenges. Low salaries, meager benefirs, and long hours continued to plague hospital nursing as they had done since nurses began working for hosp itals as general duty nurses in the mid-1930s.4 However, after the sacrifices ofWorld War II (WWII) staff nurses were increasingly restless with their working conditions and wanted improve­ ments.~ Here I describe and analyze posc-WWII hospital nurses' working conditions, nurses' reactions to their working conditions, and the reasons why many continued to work in institutional nursing in spite of the numerous drawbacks. These http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

A Hard Day’s Work: Institutional Nursing in the Post-World War II Era

Nursing History Review , Volume 8 (1): 16 – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.8.1.169
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A Hard Day's Work Institutional Nursing in the Post-World War II Era VICTORIA T. GRANDO The University of Missouri-Columbia Sinclair School of Nursing At che end of World War II the hospital industry in the United States was booming, driven largely by postwar prosperity and the dramatic rise in private health insurance plans. As money became increasingly available for health care, hospitals were .becoming centers of high technology, where more and more people went for surgery and acute care. Numerous factors precipitated in the elderly population, this new demand for services including an increase a high postwar birth rate, and numerous disabled veterans needingservices . At the same time, institutional nursing faced numerous challenges. Low salaries, meager benefirs, and long hours continued to plague hospital nursing as they had done since nurses began working for hosp itals as general duty nurses in the mid-1930s.4 However, after the sacrifices ofWorld War II (WWII) staff nurses were increasingly restless with their working conditions and wanted improve­ ments.~ Here I describe and analyze posc-WWII hospital nurses' working conditions, nurses' reactions to their working conditions, and the reasons why many continued to work in institutional nursing in spite of the numerous drawbacks. These

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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