Woody-tissue respiration for Simarouba amara and Minquartia guianensis , two tropical wet forest trees with different growth habits

Woody-tissue respiration for Simarouba amara and Minquartia guianensis , two tropical wet forest... We measured CO 2 efflux from stems of two tropical wet forest trees, both found in the canopy, but with very different growth habits. The species were Simarouba amara , a fast-growing species associated with gaps in old-growth forest and abundant in secondary forest, and Minquartia guianensis , a slow-growing species tolerant of low-light conditions in old-growth forest. Per unit of bole surface, CO 2 efflux averaged 1.24 μmol m −2 s −1 for Simarouba and 0.83 μmol m −2 s −1 for Minquartia . CO 2 efflux was highly correlated with annual wood production ( r 2 =0.65), but only weakly correlated with stem diameter ( r 2 =0.22). We also partitioned the CO 2 efflux into the functional components of construction and maintenance respiration. Construction respiration was estimated from annual stem dry matter production and maintenance respiration by subtracting construction respiration from the instantaneous CO 2 flux. Estimated maintenance respiration was linearly related to sapwood volume (39.6 μmol m −3 s −1 at 24.6° C, r 2 =0.58), with no difference in the rate for the two species. Maintenance respiration per unit of sapwood volume for these tropical wet forest trees was roughly twice that of temperate conifers. A model combining construction and maintenance respiration estimated CO 2 very well for these species ( r 2 =0.85). For our sample, maintenance respiration was 54% of the total CO 2 efflux for Simarouba and 82% for Minquartia . For our sample, sapwood volume averaged 23% of stem volume when weighted by tree size, or 40% with no size weighting. Using these fractions, and a published estimate of aboveground dry-matter production, we estimate the annual cost of woody tissue respiration for primary forest at La Selva to be 220 or 350 g C m −2 year −1 , depending on the assumed sapwood volume. These costs are estimated to be less than 13% of the gross production for the forest. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

Woody-tissue respiration for Simarouba amara and Minquartia guianensis , two tropical wet forest trees with different growth habits

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/woody-tissue-respiration-for-simarouba-amara-and-minquartia-guianensis-xM5keNgOff
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00316947
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We measured CO 2 efflux from stems of two tropical wet forest trees, both found in the canopy, but with very different growth habits. The species were Simarouba amara , a fast-growing species associated with gaps in old-growth forest and abundant in secondary forest, and Minquartia guianensis , a slow-growing species tolerant of low-light conditions in old-growth forest. Per unit of bole surface, CO 2 efflux averaged 1.24 μmol m −2 s −1 for Simarouba and 0.83 μmol m −2 s −1 for Minquartia . CO 2 efflux was highly correlated with annual wood production ( r 2 =0.65), but only weakly correlated with stem diameter ( r 2 =0.22). We also partitioned the CO 2 efflux into the functional components of construction and maintenance respiration. Construction respiration was estimated from annual stem dry matter production and maintenance respiration by subtracting construction respiration from the instantaneous CO 2 flux. Estimated maintenance respiration was linearly related to sapwood volume (39.6 μmol m −3 s −1 at 24.6° C, r 2 =0.58), with no difference in the rate for the two species. Maintenance respiration per unit of sapwood volume for these tropical wet forest trees was roughly twice that of temperate conifers. A model combining construction and maintenance respiration estimated CO 2 very well for these species ( r 2 =0.85). For our sample, maintenance respiration was 54% of the total CO 2 efflux for Simarouba and 82% for Minquartia . For our sample, sapwood volume averaged 23% of stem volume when weighted by tree size, or 40% with no size weighting. Using these fractions, and a published estimate of aboveground dry-matter production, we estimate the annual cost of woody tissue respiration for primary forest at La Selva to be 220 or 350 g C m −2 year −1 , depending on the assumed sapwood volume. These costs are estimated to be less than 13% of the gross production for the forest.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 1994

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off