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Women’s Higher Education in the United StatesFrom Haskell to Hawaii: One American Indian Woman’s Educational Journey

Women’s Higher Education in the United States: From Haskell to Hawaii: One American Indian... [In a speech about Indian customs before the student body at the University of Hawaii in the fall of 1937, Cleo Caudell, Choctaw, stated, “Indians nowadays dress and act much the same as other folks do.” Caudell was in Hawaii completing a year of post-graduate work funded by a scholarship from the Hawaiian Civic Association and Ataloa, an “Indian woman singer.” Just several years prior to her speech most American Indian women did not have access to formal educational opportunities that were available to Caudell. Before the 1930s, many Native American students were not qualified to attend schools providing formal education beyond the primary or secondary levels. By 1937 though, there was a confluence of changing ideologies for the education for American Indians, a rise in the number of Indian students qualified for college attendance, and increased attention by the American public to socially constructed concepts of American Indians. The culmination of these factors resulted in an increase in the number of Indian students eligible to attend higher education institutions. As a Choctaw student during the time of this convergence, Caudell had the means to take a higher education journey that many American Indian women would not previously have had. Although the opportunity for Caudell to obtain higher education may have appeared to be advantageous, in actuality the enduring goal of solving the Indian Problem may have provided only limited the post educational pathways for her and most Indians. From its inception, formal education for Native Americans was seen as the principal method of assimilation and conversion. With these objectives unchanged during Caudell’s educational tenure, advanced education for Indians often did not equal advanced opportunities.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Women’s Higher Education in the United StatesFrom Haskell to Hawaii: One American Indian Woman’s Educational Journey

Part of the Historical Studies in Education Book Series
Editors: Nash, Margaret A.

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2018
ISBN
978-1-137-59083-1
Pages
185 –210
DOI
10.1057/978-1-137-59084-8_9
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In a speech about Indian customs before the student body at the University of Hawaii in the fall of 1937, Cleo Caudell, Choctaw, stated, “Indians nowadays dress and act much the same as other folks do.” Caudell was in Hawaii completing a year of post-graduate work funded by a scholarship from the Hawaiian Civic Association and Ataloa, an “Indian woman singer.” Just several years prior to her speech most American Indian women did not have access to formal educational opportunities that were available to Caudell. Before the 1930s, many Native American students were not qualified to attend schools providing formal education beyond the primary or secondary levels. By 1937 though, there was a confluence of changing ideologies for the education for American Indians, a rise in the number of Indian students qualified for college attendance, and increased attention by the American public to socially constructed concepts of American Indians. The culmination of these factors resulted in an increase in the number of Indian students eligible to attend higher education institutions. As a Choctaw student during the time of this convergence, Caudell had the means to take a higher education journey that many American Indian women would not previously have had. Although the opportunity for Caudell to obtain higher education may have appeared to be advantageous, in actuality the enduring goal of solving the Indian Problem may have provided only limited the post educational pathways for her and most Indians. From its inception, formal education for Native Americans was seen as the principal method of assimilation and conversion. With these objectives unchanged during Caudell’s educational tenure, advanced education for Indians often did not equal advanced opportunities.]

Published: Jul 29, 2017

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