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Women, Rank, and Marriage in the British Aristocracy, 1485–2000“British” Marriages

Women, Rank, and Marriage in the British Aristocracy, 1485–2000: “British” Marriages [This project, in examining the marital patterns of the daughters of the British aristocracy, tends to treat the nobility of the different nations as a whole. However, for much of the period under consideration (and perhaps still today) they did not see themselves as a part of a monolithic entity. Asking the question “To what extent did the aristocracies of the different nations tend to marry one another?” sheds light on the degree to which they saw themselves as “British” rather than simply “Irish,” “English,” or “Scottish” and the extent to which an aristocratic rank identity formed that overrode a national identity. Until the nineteenth century, the marked inclination of the majority of noble women was to marry within their own nation. The picture becomes much more complex when examining the daughters of the new and the established (or old)1 nobles of each of the three primary nations as separate groups.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Women, Rank, and Marriage in the British Aristocracy, 1485–2000“British” Marriages

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2014
ISBN
978-1-349-46021-2
Pages
59 –68
DOI
10.1057/9781137327802_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[This project, in examining the marital patterns of the daughters of the British aristocracy, tends to treat the nobility of the different nations as a whole. However, for much of the period under consideration (and perhaps still today) they did not see themselves as a part of a monolithic entity. Asking the question “To what extent did the aristocracies of the different nations tend to marry one another?” sheds light on the degree to which they saw themselves as “British” rather than simply “Irish,” “English,” or “Scottish” and the extent to which an aristocratic rank identity formed that overrode a national identity. Until the nineteenth century, the marked inclination of the majority of noble women was to marry within their own nation. The picture becomes much more complex when examining the daughters of the new and the established (or old)1 nobles of each of the three primary nations as separate groups.]

Published: Nov 29, 2015

Keywords: Eighteenth Century; Seventeenth Century; Sixteenth Century; Marriage Market; Marriage Pattern

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