Weight trajectories in women receiving systemic adjuvant therapy for breast cancer

Weight trajectories in women receiving systemic adjuvant therapy for breast cancer BackgroundWeight gain after breast cancer (BC) diagnosis is a well-known phenomenon; however, it is not a universal phenomenon and identification of patients at highest risk for weight gain is needed. This study investigates weight trajectories in early BC patients at 2 years post-primary treatment, examining potential contributing factors such as age, race, and receipt of chemotherapy, anti-HER-2 therapy, and endocrine treatment (ET).MethodsA single institution cohort of newly diagnosed women age 21 and older with early breast cancer patients (Stage 0–3) were identified by retrospective chart review (diagnosis year 1995 to 2016). Log-binomial regression models for net weight changes at 2 years post-primary treatment including patient demographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics.ResultsThe final sample of 625 patients included 29% who were non-White and 37% who were pre-menopausal at diagnosis. Body mass index (BMI) at diagnosis was calculated and found to be normal in 33% (BMI 18 to < 25), overweight in 27% (BMI 25 to < 30), and obese in 40% (BMI 30 and higher). At 2 years, compared to weight at diagnosis, 31% had lost > 2 kg, 34% had stable weight ± 2 kg, and 35% had gained > 2 kg. Factors associated with > 2 kg weight gain were menopausal status (pre-menopausal HR 1.65, 95% CI 1.34–2.04, p < .0001), receiving any chemotherapy (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.04–1.77), and anthracycline-based chemotherapy followed by ET (HR 1.60, CI 1.01–2.45). Anti-HER-2 therapy and transition from pre- to post-menopausal during the 2-year study period were not significant factors in weight gain. In multivariate analysis, menopausal status remained the only significant variable related to weight gain when adjusted for treatment. For all treatment combinations, pre-menopausal women had significantly more weight gain.Conclusions and relevanceWeight gain, weight loss, and stable weight in women with early breast cancer vary greatly by treatment plan. However, pre-menopausal patients have the highest risk for weight gain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Breast Cancer Research and Treatment Springer Journals

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/weight-trajectories-in-women-receiving-systemic-adjuvant-therapy-for-tSnq985syk
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Oncology
ISSN
0167-6806
eISSN
1573-7217
DOI
10.1007/s10549-019-05501-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BackgroundWeight gain after breast cancer (BC) diagnosis is a well-known phenomenon; however, it is not a universal phenomenon and identification of patients at highest risk for weight gain is needed. This study investigates weight trajectories in early BC patients at 2 years post-primary treatment, examining potential contributing factors such as age, race, and receipt of chemotherapy, anti-HER-2 therapy, and endocrine treatment (ET).MethodsA single institution cohort of newly diagnosed women age 21 and older with early breast cancer patients (Stage 0–3) were identified by retrospective chart review (diagnosis year 1995 to 2016). Log-binomial regression models for net weight changes at 2 years post-primary treatment including patient demographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics.ResultsThe final sample of 625 patients included 29% who were non-White and 37% who were pre-menopausal at diagnosis. Body mass index (BMI) at diagnosis was calculated and found to be normal in 33% (BMI 18 to < 25), overweight in 27% (BMI 25 to < 30), and obese in 40% (BMI 30 and higher). At 2 years, compared to weight at diagnosis, 31% had lost > 2 kg, 34% had stable weight ± 2 kg, and 35% had gained > 2 kg. Factors associated with > 2 kg weight gain were menopausal status (pre-menopausal HR 1.65, 95% CI 1.34–2.04, p < .0001), receiving any chemotherapy (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.04–1.77), and anthracycline-based chemotherapy followed by ET (HR 1.60, CI 1.01–2.45). Anti-HER-2 therapy and transition from pre- to post-menopausal during the 2-year study period were not significant factors in weight gain. In multivariate analysis, menopausal status remained the only significant variable related to weight gain when adjusted for treatment. For all treatment combinations, pre-menopausal women had significantly more weight gain.Conclusions and relevanceWeight gain, weight loss, and stable weight in women with early breast cancer vary greatly by treatment plan. However, pre-menopausal patients have the highest risk for weight gain.

Journal

Breast Cancer Research and TreatmentSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 16, 2020

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off