Visual and visuomotor performance in dyslexic children

Visual and visuomotor performance in dyslexic children 221 106 106 3 3 K. L. Felmingham L. S. Jakobson jakobson@pavlov.psyc.queensu.ca Department of Psychology Queen's University K7L 3N6 Kingston Ontario Canada Abstract The present study was designed to compare the performance of nine dyslexic boys and nine age- and IQ-matched controls on tasks which presumably tap visual functions dependent on the subcortical magnocellular (M) pathway (flicker sensitivity) and the cortical dorsal stream (stereoacuity, structure-from-motion, visuomotor control). Increasing evidence suggests that dyslexics experience impairments in M-system functioning. In keeping with previous work supporting this conclusion, dyslexic subjects in the present study were found to have reduced sensitivity to flicker relative to controls. Given that the M system provides the predominant input to the dorsal stream, it was expected that reduced functioning of the M system in dyslexics would result in disruptions of functions related to this cortical visual pathway. Indeed, dyslexic subjects in the present study were found to be less efficient at recognizing structure-from-motion and less accurate at grasping objects precisely. They also showed a mild impairment in stereoacuity. These results, then, lend some support to the hypothesis that dyslexic individuals should show deficiencies on tasks dependent on dorsal stream processing of visual information. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experimental Brain Research Springer Journals

Visual and visuomotor performance in dyslexic children

Experimental Brain Research, Volume 106 (3) – Jan 1, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/visual-and-visuomotor-performance-in-dyslexic-children-zCLiR9u8Tb
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Neurology
ISSN
0014-4819
eISSN
1432-1106
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00231069
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

221 106 106 3 3 K. L. Felmingham L. S. Jakobson jakobson@pavlov.psyc.queensu.ca Department of Psychology Queen's University K7L 3N6 Kingston Ontario Canada Abstract The present study was designed to compare the performance of nine dyslexic boys and nine age- and IQ-matched controls on tasks which presumably tap visual functions dependent on the subcortical magnocellular (M) pathway (flicker sensitivity) and the cortical dorsal stream (stereoacuity, structure-from-motion, visuomotor control). Increasing evidence suggests that dyslexics experience impairments in M-system functioning. In keeping with previous work supporting this conclusion, dyslexic subjects in the present study were found to have reduced sensitivity to flicker relative to controls. Given that the M system provides the predominant input to the dorsal stream, it was expected that reduced functioning of the M system in dyslexics would result in disruptions of functions related to this cortical visual pathway. Indeed, dyslexic subjects in the present study were found to be less efficient at recognizing structure-from-motion and less accurate at grasping objects precisely. They also showed a mild impairment in stereoacuity. These results, then, lend some support to the hypothesis that dyslexic individuals should show deficiencies on tasks dependent on dorsal stream processing of visual information.

Journal

Experimental Brain ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 1995

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off