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Using Brexanolone for Postpartum Depression Must Account for Lactation

Using Brexanolone for Postpartum Depression Must Account for Lactation On March 19, 2019, Brexanolone (Zulresso ™) was released as the first-ever FDA-approved medication specifically for the treatment of postpartum depression by Sage Therapeutics, Inc. Unfortunately, its use in breastfeeding mothers was not evaluated and is being restricted. An efficacious drug for postpartum depression stands to benefit many families. However, the lack of guidance for breastfeeding patients, and the resultant restrictions on breastfeeding by insurance companies is deeply troubling. Conversely, withholding this medication from a lactating mother is ethically problematic. From a public health perspective, we aim to foster continuous breastfeeding among depressed women while they are being treated for depression. We therefore aim to address concerns about Brexanolone’s effects on the breastfed child, as exposed through breastmilk, as well as the impact this medication may have on lactation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Maternal and Child Health Journal Springer Journals

Using Brexanolone for Postpartum Depression Must Account for Lactation

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2021
ISSN
1092-7875
eISSN
1573-6628
DOI
10.1007/s10995-021-03144-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

On March 19, 2019, Brexanolone (Zulresso ™) was released as the first-ever FDA-approved medication specifically for the treatment of postpartum depression by Sage Therapeutics, Inc. Unfortunately, its use in breastfeeding mothers was not evaluated and is being restricted. An efficacious drug for postpartum depression stands to benefit many families. However, the lack of guidance for breastfeeding patients, and the resultant restrictions on breastfeeding by insurance companies is deeply troubling. Conversely, withholding this medication from a lactating mother is ethically problematic. From a public health perspective, we aim to foster continuous breastfeeding among depressed women while they are being treated for depression. We therefore aim to address concerns about Brexanolone’s effects on the breastfed child, as exposed through breastmilk, as well as the impact this medication may have on lactation.

Journal

Maternal and Child Health JournalSpringer Journals

Published: May 21, 2021

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