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University Dynamics and European IntegrationThe Bologna Process: An Intergovernmental Policy Perspective

University Dynamics and European Integration: The Bologna Process: An Intergovernmental Policy... CHAPTER 7 THE BOLOGNA PROCESS: AN INTERGOVERNMENTAL POLICY PERSPECTIVE Guy Neave and Peter Maassen INTRODUCTION In this and the following chapter the empirical complexity of the attempts to integrate Europe as applied to the university sector, and very particularly the Bologna and Lisbon processes, will be discussed. Both chapters show that to study any single process of European integration in isolation is problematic. Under some conditions, as both Bologna and Lisbon demonstrate, reform processes interact and intertwine, if not integrate, as several partially interconnected developments intersect, cross and meld. An important foundation stone in the Bologna process can be traced back to 1988, when university leaders of Europe came together in Bologna to sign the Magna Charta Universitatum. This declaration extolled certain fundamental values of the University: academic freedom, the freedom to teach and learn, and with it, university autonomy. Ten years later (May 1998) the 800th anniversary of the Sorbonne was celebrated in Paris, during which occasion the British, French, German, and Italian Ministers responsible for higher education signed a joint declaration (the Sorbonne Declaration) aimed at harmonizing the structure of higher education in the four coun- tries. One year later (June 1999) Ministers of Higher Education of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

University Dynamics and European IntegrationThe Bologna Process: An Intergovernmental Policy Perspective

Part of the Higher Education Dynamics Book Series (volume 19)
Editors: Maassen, Peter; Olsen, Johan P.

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer 2007
ISBN
978-1-4020-5970-4
Pages
135 –154
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4020-5971-1_7
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHAPTER 7 THE BOLOGNA PROCESS: AN INTERGOVERNMENTAL POLICY PERSPECTIVE Guy Neave and Peter Maassen INTRODUCTION In this and the following chapter the empirical complexity of the attempts to integrate Europe as applied to the university sector, and very particularly the Bologna and Lisbon processes, will be discussed. Both chapters show that to study any single process of European integration in isolation is problematic. Under some conditions, as both Bologna and Lisbon demonstrate, reform processes interact and intertwine, if not integrate, as several partially interconnected developments intersect, cross and meld. An important foundation stone in the Bologna process can be traced back to 1988, when university leaders of Europe came together in Bologna to sign the Magna Charta Universitatum. This declaration extolled certain fundamental values of the University: academic freedom, the freedom to teach and learn, and with it, university autonomy. Ten years later (May 1998) the 800th anniversary of the Sorbonne was celebrated in Paris, during which occasion the British, French, German, and Italian Ministers responsible for higher education signed a joint declaration (the Sorbonne Declaration) aimed at harmonizing the structure of higher education in the four coun- tries. One year later (June 1999) Ministers of Higher Education of

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: High Education; Member State; Welfare State; Social Cohesion; High Education Policy

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