Understanding Self-Report Bias in Organizational Behavior Research

Understanding Self-Report Bias in Organizational Behavior Research Self-report and mono-method bias often threaten the validity of research conducted in business settings and thus hinder the development of theories of organizational behavior. This paper outlines a conceptual framework for understanding factors that influence the motivation of an employee to bias his or her responses to questions posed by organizational researchers. Using a longitudinal, multitrait-multimethod dataset, we illustrate various aspects of the problem and argue that traditional approaches for controlling self-report bias do not adequately prevent the problem. The results suggest the need for developing a theory of method effects and companion analytic techniques to improve the accuracy of psychological research in business settings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Business and Psychology Springer Journals

Understanding Self-Report Bias in Organizational Behavior Research

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Human Sciences Press, Inc.
Subject
Psychology; Industrial and Organizational Psychology; Community and Environmental Psychology; Personality and Social Psychology; Business and Management, general; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0889-3268
eISSN
1573-353X
DOI
10.1023/A:1019637632584
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Self-report and mono-method bias often threaten the validity of research conducted in business settings and thus hinder the development of theories of organizational behavior. This paper outlines a conceptual framework for understanding factors that influence the motivation of an employee to bias his or her responses to questions posed by organizational researchers. Using a longitudinal, multitrait-multimethod dataset, we illustrate various aspects of the problem and argue that traditional approaches for controlling self-report bias do not adequately prevent the problem. The results suggest the need for developing a theory of method effects and companion analytic techniques to improve the accuracy of psychological research in business settings.

Journal

Journal of Business and PsychologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 12, 2004

References

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