Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Two Feet-One Hand Syndrome: Tinea Pedis and Tinea Manuum

Two Feet-One Hand Syndrome: Tinea Pedis and Tinea Manuum Purpose of ReviewWe performed a systematic review of literature from the PubMed database on January 1, 2019, to July 31, 2022. The search criteria were “(tinea manuum OR tinea pedis) AND “two feet-one hand syndrome,” with full text available and English or Spanish language required. This review will focus on the available data supporting the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of the two feet-one hand syndrome.Recent FindingsTwo feet-one hand syndrome is a superficial fungal skin infection involving bilateral plantar tinea pedis with coexistent unilateral tinea manuum. Toenails and fingernails may also be affected. Anthropophilic fungal species are the leading cause of dermatophytosis in adults and are isolated more often in males than in females. The species usually involved are Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton interdigitale, and Epidermophyton floccosum. Non-dermatophytic filamentous fungi such as Hendersonula toruloidea and Scytalidium hyalinum are the confirmed etiologic agents of palm, sole, and nail infections. This syndrome is highly associated with onychomycosis, and nearly 6% of the patients with onychomycosis develop two feet-one hand syndrome. Typically, tinea pedis occurs at an earlier age than tinea manuum. The infection is transmitted from one foot to the hand by excoriating the soles of the feet and picking toenails and then is transferred from the hand to the other foot. In some cases, tinea manuum develops in both hands, in contrast to the name “one hand.”SummaryThe two feet-one hand syndrome is not uncommon; however, there have only been a few reports on this condition. This revision was undertaken to understand better the disease’s epidemiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, and treatment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Fungal Infection Reports Springer Journals

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/two-feet-one-hand-syndrome-tinea-pedis-and-tinea-manuum-24x8FvpVFv
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2022. Springer Nature or its licensor (e.g. a society or other partner) holds exclusive rights to this article under a publishing agreement with the author(s) or other rightsholder(s); author self-archiving of the accepted manuscript version of this article is solely governed by the terms of such publishing agreement and applicable law.
ISSN
1936-3761
eISSN
1936-377X
DOI
10.1007/s12281-022-00447-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of ReviewWe performed a systematic review of literature from the PubMed database on January 1, 2019, to July 31, 2022. The search criteria were “(tinea manuum OR tinea pedis) AND “two feet-one hand syndrome,” with full text available and English or Spanish language required. This review will focus on the available data supporting the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of the two feet-one hand syndrome.Recent FindingsTwo feet-one hand syndrome is a superficial fungal skin infection involving bilateral plantar tinea pedis with coexistent unilateral tinea manuum. Toenails and fingernails may also be affected. Anthropophilic fungal species are the leading cause of dermatophytosis in adults and are isolated more often in males than in females. The species usually involved are Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton interdigitale, and Epidermophyton floccosum. Non-dermatophytic filamentous fungi such as Hendersonula toruloidea and Scytalidium hyalinum are the confirmed etiologic agents of palm, sole, and nail infections. This syndrome is highly associated with onychomycosis, and nearly 6% of the patients with onychomycosis develop two feet-one hand syndrome. Typically, tinea pedis occurs at an earlier age than tinea manuum. The infection is transmitted from one foot to the hand by excoriating the soles of the feet and picking toenails and then is transferred from the hand to the other foot. In some cases, tinea manuum develops in both hands, in contrast to the name “one hand.”SummaryThe two feet-one hand syndrome is not uncommon; however, there have only been a few reports on this condition. This revision was undertaken to understand better the disease’s epidemiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, and treatment.

Journal

Current Fungal Infection ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2022

Keywords: Tinea pedis; Tinea manuum; Dermatophytosis; Dermatophytes; Trichophyton rubrum

References