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Toward Improved Identification of Parental Substance Misuse: An Examination of Current Practices and Gaps in One US State

Toward Improved Identification of Parental Substance Misuse: An Examination of Current Practices... IntroductionThe use of illicit substances, including opioids, is a serious public health issue in the United States. While there are reports of the impact of the ongoing opioid crisis on adults, a new focus has emerged on how parental substance misuse (PSM) affects children. This study explored existing screening and assessment practices and services for children and families affected by PSM across different service sectors in one state. The purpose of the study was to identify opportunities for training, policy development, and practice improvement related to identifying PSM and linking children and parents to services.MethodsInterviews (n = 15) with professionals from five service sectors (mental health, primary care, schools, community programs, and law enforcement) were used to inform development of a state-wide survey of the same groups (n = 498) to assess current practices, attitudes, knowledge, and training needs related to child screening of PSM. The survey was piloted using cognitive interviewing (n = 9) before it was distributed.ResultsFewer than 20% of survey respondents reported using standardized tools specific to screening PSM. Informal assessment practices predominate, though 60% of respondents saw value in adopting more standardized PSM screening. Attitudes about PSM and screening varied among sectors but interest in training was high.DiscussionResults indicate a need for more systematic PSM screening, cross-sector training and practice discussions, and policies to support early identification of children affected by PSM. Ramifications of these findings and recommendations are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Maternal and Child Health Journal Springer Journals

Toward Improved Identification of Parental Substance Misuse: An Examination of Current Practices and Gaps in One US State

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2021
ISSN
1092-7875
eISSN
1573-6628
DOI
10.1007/s10995-021-03138-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionThe use of illicit substances, including opioids, is a serious public health issue in the United States. While there are reports of the impact of the ongoing opioid crisis on adults, a new focus has emerged on how parental substance misuse (PSM) affects children. This study explored existing screening and assessment practices and services for children and families affected by PSM across different service sectors in one state. The purpose of the study was to identify opportunities for training, policy development, and practice improvement related to identifying PSM and linking children and parents to services.MethodsInterviews (n = 15) with professionals from five service sectors (mental health, primary care, schools, community programs, and law enforcement) were used to inform development of a state-wide survey of the same groups (n = 498) to assess current practices, attitudes, knowledge, and training needs related to child screening of PSM. The survey was piloted using cognitive interviewing (n = 9) before it was distributed.ResultsFewer than 20% of survey respondents reported using standardized tools specific to screening PSM. Informal assessment practices predominate, though 60% of respondents saw value in adopting more standardized PSM screening. Attitudes about PSM and screening varied among sectors but interest in training was high.DiscussionResults indicate a need for more systematic PSM screening, cross-sector training and practice discussions, and policies to support early identification of children affected by PSM. Ramifications of these findings and recommendations are discussed.

Journal

Maternal and Child Health JournalSpringer Journals

Published: May 14, 2021

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