Toward a design theory of problem solving

Toward a design theory of problem solving Problem solving is generally regarded as the most important cognitive activity in everyday and professional contexts. Most people are required to and rewarded for solving problems. However, learning to solve problems is too seldom required in formal educational settings, in part, because our understanding of its processes is limited. Instructional-design research and theory has devoted too little attention to the study of problem-solving processes. In this article, I describe differences among problems in terms of their structuredness, domain specificity (abstractness), and complexity. Then, I briefly describe a variety of individual differences (factors internal to the problem solver) that affect problem solving. Finally, I articulate a typology of problems, each type of which engages different cognitive, affective, and conative processes and therefore necessitates different instructional support. The purpose of this paper is to propose a metatheory of problem solving in order to initiate dialogue and research rather than offering a definitive answer regarding its processes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational Technology Research and Development Springer Journals

Toward a design theory of problem solving

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology
Subject
Education; Educational Technology; Learning and Instruction
ISSN
1042-1629
eISSN
1556-6501
DOI
10.1007/BF02300500
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Problem solving is generally regarded as the most important cognitive activity in everyday and professional contexts. Most people are required to and rewarded for solving problems. However, learning to solve problems is too seldom required in formal educational settings, in part, because our understanding of its processes is limited. Instructional-design research and theory has devoted too little attention to the study of problem-solving processes. In this article, I describe differences among problems in terms of their structuredness, domain specificity (abstractness), and complexity. Then, I briefly describe a variety of individual differences (factors internal to the problem solver) that affect problem solving. Finally, I articulate a typology of problems, each type of which engages different cognitive, affective, and conative processes and therefore necessitates different instructional support. The purpose of this paper is to propose a metatheory of problem solving in order to initiate dialogue and research rather than offering a definitive answer regarding its processes.

Journal

Educational Technology Research and DevelopmentSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 4, 2006

References

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