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Theopoetics of the WordThe Kenotic Utopianism of Language

Theopoetics of the Word: The Kenotic Utopianism of Language [Voice is a way of being, argues Giorgio Agamben, 1 as though the statement could not be reversed: being is a way of speaking. And yet it is the same author who, like Lacan, also points out that “the appearance of a new religion always coincides with a new revelation of language and a new religion means above all a new experience of language.”2 So much so, indeed, that insofar as humanity is concerned, there can be no God except through language (whereby yes is yes and no is no as is the yes to God at one and the same time as a no to the idol regardless of which has preponderance over the other). There is no religion unless God—or the idol it is frozen in—is tipped into language. And yet is no God that God which can only be this or that God. (Dieu ne peut qu’être sans l’être). Even rather than this or that being, God is verbum, no less a word than the Word. God no less brings to words than calls into being.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Theopoetics of the WordThe Kenotic Utopianism of Language

Part of the Radical Theologies Book Series
Theopoetics of the Word — Nov 1, 2015

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2014
ISBN
978-1-137-44062-4
Pages
35 –52
DOI
10.1057/9781137440631_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Voice is a way of being, argues Giorgio Agamben, 1 as though the statement could not be reversed: being is a way of speaking. And yet it is the same author who, like Lacan, also points out that “the appearance of a new religion always coincides with a new revelation of language and a new religion means above all a new experience of language.”2 So much so, indeed, that insofar as humanity is concerned, there can be no God except through language (whereby yes is yes and no is no as is the yes to God at one and the same time as a no to the idol regardless of which has preponderance over the other). There is no religion unless God—or the idol it is frozen in—is tipped into language. And yet is no God that God which can only be this or that God. (Dieu ne peut qu’être sans l’être). Even rather than this or that being, God is verbum, no less a word than the Word. God no less brings to words than calls into being.]

Published: Nov 1, 2015

Keywords: Verbal Condition; Religious Tradition; Ritual Ceremony; Ancillary Mode; Biblical Exegesis

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