The tobacco bZIP transcription factor BZI-1 binds to G-box elements in the promoters of phenylpropanoid pathway genes in vitro, but it is not involved in their regulation in vivo

The tobacco bZIP transcription factor BZI-1 binds to G-box elements in the promoters of... Screening of a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cDNA library resulted in the isolation of a clone encoding the bZIP transcription factor BZI-1. With respect to amino acid sequence, conservation of protein domains, genomic exon-intron structure and expression pattern, BZI-1 is closely related to CPRF2, OHP1/2, BLZ1 and REB, a group of bZIP proteins which have been described in a number of dicot and monocot species. BZI-1 exhibits the characteristics of a transcription factor. It binds to G-box and C-box cis-elements in vitro, it is localised in the nucleus, and the N-terminal region of BZI-1 functions as an activation domain in both yeast and plant cells. Since BZI-1-related transcription factors have been isolated from dicots by in vitro binding to G-box elements in the chalcone synthase (CHS) promoter, it has been suggested that phenylpropanoid pathway genes, such as CHS and PAL (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase), are targets of these proteins in vivo. However, after infection with Pseudomonas syringae or Tobacco Mosaic Virus, no changes in pathogen-induced PAL expression were observed in transgenic plants expressing increased levels of BZI-1 or a dominant negative form of the protein, BZI-1-ΔN. In contrast to the tissue-specific expression of CHS and PAL, BZI-1 was found to be ubiquitously expressed in tobacco plants. Furthermore, no changes in the tissue-specific expression of PAL or CHS were observed in plants that were transgenic for BZI-1-ΔN. Expression of a VP16-BZI-1 fusion protein would be expected to result in constitutive activation of the BZI-1 target genes. However, tetracycline-dependent expression of a VP16-BZI-1 protein in tobacco plants did not result in activation of CHS or PAL. On the basis of these data, we conclude that the phenylpropanoid pathway genes analysed are not targets of BZI-1 in vivo. Thus, the pattern of in vitro DNA binding of transcription factors need not always reflect their in vivo function. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Genetics and Genomics Springer Journals

The tobacco bZIP transcription factor BZI-1 binds to G-box elements in the promoters of phenylpropanoid pathway genes in vitro, but it is not involved in their regulation in vivo

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/the-tobacco-bzip-transcription-factor-bzi-1-binds-to-g-box-elements-in-3kvDuyJYel
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Biochemistry, general; Microbial Genetics and Genomics; Plant Genetics & Genomics; Animal Genetics and Genomics
ISSN
1617-4615
eISSN
1617-4623
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00438-001-0636-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Screening of a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cDNA library resulted in the isolation of a clone encoding the bZIP transcription factor BZI-1. With respect to amino acid sequence, conservation of protein domains, genomic exon-intron structure and expression pattern, BZI-1 is closely related to CPRF2, OHP1/2, BLZ1 and REB, a group of bZIP proteins which have been described in a number of dicot and monocot species. BZI-1 exhibits the characteristics of a transcription factor. It binds to G-box and C-box cis-elements in vitro, it is localised in the nucleus, and the N-terminal region of BZI-1 functions as an activation domain in both yeast and plant cells. Since BZI-1-related transcription factors have been isolated from dicots by in vitro binding to G-box elements in the chalcone synthase (CHS) promoter, it has been suggested that phenylpropanoid pathway genes, such as CHS and PAL (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase), are targets of these proteins in vivo. However, after infection with Pseudomonas syringae or Tobacco Mosaic Virus, no changes in pathogen-induced PAL expression were observed in transgenic plants expressing increased levels of BZI-1 or a dominant negative form of the protein, BZI-1-ΔN. In contrast to the tissue-specific expression of CHS and PAL, BZI-1 was found to be ubiquitously expressed in tobacco plants. Furthermore, no changes in the tissue-specific expression of PAL or CHS were observed in plants that were transgenic for BZI-1-ΔN. Expression of a VP16-BZI-1 fusion protein would be expected to result in constitutive activation of the BZI-1 target genes. However, tetracycline-dependent expression of a VP16-BZI-1 protein in tobacco plants did not result in activation of CHS or PAL. On the basis of these data, we conclude that the phenylpropanoid pathway genes analysed are not targets of BZI-1 in vivo. Thus, the pattern of in vitro DNA binding of transcription factors need not always reflect their in vivo function.

Journal

Molecular Genetics and GenomicsSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 12, 2002

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off