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The threat of comprehensive overstimulation in modern societies

The threat of comprehensive overstimulation in modern societies Members of modern, digital societies experience a tremendous number and diversity of stimuli from sources such as computers, televisions, other electronic media, and various forms of advertising. In this paper, I argue that the presence of a wide range of stimulating items in modern societies poses a special risk to the welfare of members of modern societies. By considering the set of modern stimuli in a more comprehensive way than normative theorists have done so far—as part of a complex system with which members of modern societies cannot reasonably avoid interacting—we can see why the perceptual and informational spaces in which modern life occurs can be sources of disvalue for members of modern societies. This seems true even though the technological innovations that produce these stimuli add great value to the lives of members of modern societies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethics and Information Technology Springer Journals

The threat of comprehensive overstimulation in modern societies

Ethics and Information Technology , Volume 19 (1) – Dec 8, 2016

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References (19)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Computer Science; Management of Computing and Information Systems; Innovation/Technology Management; Ethics; User Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction; Library Science
ISSN
1388-1957
eISSN
1572-8439
DOI
10.1007/s10676-016-9414-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Members of modern, digital societies experience a tremendous number and diversity of stimuli from sources such as computers, televisions, other electronic media, and various forms of advertising. In this paper, I argue that the presence of a wide range of stimulating items in modern societies poses a special risk to the welfare of members of modern societies. By considering the set of modern stimuli in a more comprehensive way than normative theorists have done so far—as part of a complex system with which members of modern societies cannot reasonably avoid interacting—we can see why the perceptual and informational spaces in which modern life occurs can be sources of disvalue for members of modern societies. This seems true even though the technological innovations that produce these stimuli add great value to the lives of members of modern societies.

Journal

Ethics and Information TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 8, 2016

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