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The role for intramuscular testosterone injection in the gel era

The role for intramuscular testosterone injection in the gel era New treatment modalities for testosterone deficiency have evolved, such as the gels and the long-acting parenteral testosterone undecanoate (TU). Both fulfill the criteria of adequate androgen therapy, have proven to be effective in ameliorating sexual functions in young and elderly men, and are safe. Their mode of administration could not be more divergent; the gel requires daily application, but TU is administered every 12 weeks intramuscularly. A patient receiving long-acting TU being at higher risk when diagnosed with prostate carcinoma than one being treated with a gel is no longer believed, because the delay between diagnosing and treating prostate carcinomas almost always exceeds the duration of action of TU, which is 12 to 14 weeks. So, TU appears to be a viable alternative to the gels and will be preferred by many patients as a lesser interference with their daily lives. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Sexual Health Reports Springer Journals

The role for intramuscular testosterone injection in the gel era

Current Sexual Health Reports , Volume 4 (3) – Aug 24, 2007

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Urology; Endocrinology
ISSN
1548-3584
eISSN
1548-3592
DOI
10.1007/s11930-007-0014-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

New treatment modalities for testosterone deficiency have evolved, such as the gels and the long-acting parenteral testosterone undecanoate (TU). Both fulfill the criteria of adequate androgen therapy, have proven to be effective in ameliorating sexual functions in young and elderly men, and are safe. Their mode of administration could not be more divergent; the gel requires daily application, but TU is administered every 12 weeks intramuscularly. A patient receiving long-acting TU being at higher risk when diagnosed with prostate carcinoma than one being treated with a gel is no longer believed, because the delay between diagnosing and treating prostate carcinomas almost always exceeds the duration of action of TU, which is 12 to 14 weeks. So, TU appears to be a viable alternative to the gels and will be preferred by many patients as a lesser interference with their daily lives.

Journal

Current Sexual Health ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 24, 2007

References