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The Politics of Regional Integration in Latin AmericaRegional Multilevel Governance in the Americas?

The Politics of Regional Integration in Latin America: Regional Multilevel Governance in the... [As previously mentioned, the 1990s have witnessed an amazing reactivation of regional integration in the Americas. In addition to the relaunching of older processes in Central America and in the Andes, and the initiation of new ones in North America (NAFTA) and the Southern Cone (MERCOSUR), the overall panoramabecame increasingly complex following the 1994 Summit of the Americas and the subsequent opening of hemispherical negotiations. At that time, conventional wisdom was that all the different existing integration processes would converge. A decade later, the project of a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) was stalemated, but the Summit of the Americas Process was alive, tentatively addressing a growing number of issues. In parallel, reacting to the frustration caused by the failed FTAA, the United States started to negotiate bilateral Free Trade Agreements (FTAs). Venezuela, on its side, chose to oppose the FTAA, offering the Latin Americans a “Bolivarian Alternative” (ALBAN).] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Politics of Regional Integration in Latin AmericaRegional Multilevel Governance in the Americas?

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References (2)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2009
ISBN
978-1-349-37545-5
Pages
195 –213
DOI
10.1057/9780230100749_9
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[As previously mentioned, the 1990s have witnessed an amazing reactivation of regional integration in the Americas. In addition to the relaunching of older processes in Central America and in the Andes, and the initiation of new ones in North America (NAFTA) and the Southern Cone (MERCOSUR), the overall panoramabecame increasingly complex following the 1994 Summit of the Americas and the subsequent opening of hemispherical negotiations. At that time, conventional wisdom was that all the different existing integration processes would converge. A decade later, the project of a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) was stalemated, but the Summit of the Americas Process was alive, tentatively addressing a growing number of issues. In parallel, reacting to the frustration caused by the failed FTAA, the United States started to negotiate bilateral Free Trade Agreements (FTAs). Venezuela, on its side, chose to oppose the FTAA, offering the Latin Americans a “Bolivarian Alternative” (ALBAN).]

Published: Oct 8, 2015

Keywords: Civil Society; Regional Integration; Regional Governance; Issue Area; Trade Facilitation

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