Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Pelvic Floor Muscle: the Link Between Bladder, Bowel, and…Sex? A Review of Current Pelvic Therapy Approaches for Diagnosis and Treatment of Sexual Disorders

The Pelvic Floor Muscle: the Link Between Bladder, Bowel, and…Sex? A Review of Current Pelvic... Sexual issues arise for a multitude of reasons. Current literature draws attention to the importance of healthy bladder and bowel function and pelvic organ support, for sexual well-being. Since pelvic floor muscle (PFM) impairment has been associated with all forms of pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD), bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction, pelvic pain, and pelvic organ prolapse, the PFM may play both primary and secondary roles in sexual function and should not be overlooked during treatment of sexual disorders. Literature suggests that conservative pelvic therapy may significantly improve concerns of all forms of PFD and, therefore, stands to offer important contributions to the diagnosis and treatment approaches to sexual disorders. While PFM exercise training has been found beneficial for improving sexual function in women with PFD, an all-inclusive PFM therapy approach to treating this muscle may be more so, and this conservative management should be considered as first-line defense. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Sexual Health Reports Springer Journals

The Pelvic Floor Muscle: the Link Between Bladder, Bowel, and…Sex? A Review of Current Pelvic Therapy Approaches for Diagnosis and Treatment of Sexual Disorders

Current Sexual Health Reports , Volume 6 (3) – Jun 21, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/the-pelvic-floor-muscle-the-link-between-bladder-bowel-and-sex-a-oOaPMIjCtS
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Urology/Andrology; Endocrinology
ISSN
1548-3584
eISSN
1548-3592
DOI
10.1007/s11930-014-0025-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sexual issues arise for a multitude of reasons. Current literature draws attention to the importance of healthy bladder and bowel function and pelvic organ support, for sexual well-being. Since pelvic floor muscle (PFM) impairment has been associated with all forms of pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD), bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction, pelvic pain, and pelvic organ prolapse, the PFM may play both primary and secondary roles in sexual function and should not be overlooked during treatment of sexual disorders. Literature suggests that conservative pelvic therapy may significantly improve concerns of all forms of PFD and, therefore, stands to offer important contributions to the diagnosis and treatment approaches to sexual disorders. While PFM exercise training has been found beneficial for improving sexual function in women with PFD, an all-inclusive PFM therapy approach to treating this muscle may be more so, and this conservative management should be considered as first-line defense.

Journal

Current Sexual Health ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 21, 2014

There are no references for this article.