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The neuro-cognitive turn in cultural sociology: from 1.0 to 2.0

The neuro-cognitive turn in cultural sociology: from 1.0 to 2.0 American Journal of Cultural Sociology (2020) 8:1–2 https://doi.org/10.1057/s41290-020-00096-w EDITORIAL The neuro‑cognitive turn in cultural sociology: from 1.0 to 2.0 Philip Smith Published online: 8 February 2020 © Springer Nature Limited 2020 It is an intellectual move with familiar talking points. Social theory is full of vague concepts. It has been going nowhere for a long time, replaying tired debates and reinventing the wheel. In empirical research and  all too rare efforts at actual explanation, understandings about causality are hopelessly muddled. The model of the human actor we have been working with is just plain wrong. We need to get back to basics and build knowledge in a more coherent way from the ground up. In other disciplines they do things better than we do. They have found truths, not endless debates, because they are scientists not sophists. We are behind the times. If only our research community could look up from wordy foundational texts by long dead figures and see the leading edge was no longer the year 1900, or 1950 or even 1980—then we could all move on. Something like this spirit of renewal animated George Homans with his push for an atomized exchange theory and the identification of universal rules of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Cultural Sociology Springer Journals

The neuro-cognitive turn in cultural sociology: from 1.0 to 2.0

American Journal of Cultural Sociology , Volume 8 (1): 2 – Apr 1, 2020

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
2020 Springer Nature Limited
ISSN
2049-7113
eISSN
2049-7121
DOI
10.1057/s41290-020-00096-w
Publisher site
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Abstract

American Journal of Cultural Sociology (2020) 8:1–2 https://doi.org/10.1057/s41290-020-00096-w EDITORIAL The neuro‑cognitive turn in cultural sociology: from 1.0 to 2.0 Philip Smith Published online: 8 February 2020 © Springer Nature Limited 2020 It is an intellectual move with familiar talking points. Social theory is full of vague concepts. It has been going nowhere for a long time, replaying tired debates and reinventing the wheel. In empirical research and  all too rare efforts at actual explanation, understandings about causality are hopelessly muddled. The model of the human actor we have been working with is just plain wrong. We need to get back to basics and build knowledge in a more coherent way from the ground up. In other disciplines they do things better than we do. They have found truths, not endless debates, because they are scientists not sophists. We are behind the times. If only our research community could look up from wordy foundational texts by long dead figures and see the leading edge was no longer the year 1900, or 1950 or even 1980—then we could all move on. Something like this spirit of renewal animated George Homans with his push for an atomized exchange theory and the identification of universal rules of

Journal

American Journal of Cultural SociologySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 1, 2020

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