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The Laws of LoveThe Casuistry of Kissing

The Laws of Love: The Casuistry of Kissing [Here is an interesting thought. Those who study such things usually break down the meaning of the word philosophy into its Greek roots of philein or friend and sophia or wisdom. I have done that myself, on occasion, so as to make an argument about friendship and knowledge. It works well enough. It helps make the point that philosophy means amity for ideas. The word philein, however, also meant to kiss and so philosophy could equally mean the kissing of wisdom, or the wisdom of kissing. This suggests—does it not?—that the kiss and kissing, proper noun and transitive verb, osculatory theory and practice, insufflation literal and metaphorical go to the very roots of the tradition. Study of the wisdom of kissing may not be how we normally think of the philosophical tradition, it may in fact be a secondary meaning of the discipline, a shadow side perhaps, but it is everywhere present. Kissing is more or less a synonym for community. No sociality without osculation. And then as well kissing is the emblematic sign of desire. As Freud later observed, in those moments of animation that are of the essence of living well we are very keen to taste each other.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Laws of LoveThe Casuistry of Kissing

Part of the Language, Discourse, Society Book Series
The Laws of Love — Sep 30, 2015

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2007
ISBN
978-1-349-28311-8
Pages
109 –122
DOI
10.1057/9780230626539_7
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Here is an interesting thought. Those who study such things usually break down the meaning of the word philosophy into its Greek roots of philein or friend and sophia or wisdom. I have done that myself, on occasion, so as to make an argument about friendship and knowledge. It works well enough. It helps make the point that philosophy means amity for ideas. The word philein, however, also meant to kiss and so philosophy could equally mean the kissing of wisdom, or the wisdom of kissing. This suggests—does it not?—that the kiss and kissing, proper noun and transitive verb, osculatory theory and practice, insufflation literal and metaphorical go to the very roots of the tradition. Study of the wisdom of kissing may not be how we normally think of the philosophical tradition, it may in fact be a secondary meaning of the discipline, a shadow side perhaps, but it is everywhere present. Kissing is more or less a synonym for community. No sociality without osculation. And then as well kissing is the emblematic sign of desire. As Freud later observed, in those moments of animation that are of the essence of living well we are very keen to taste each other.]

Published: Sep 30, 2015

Keywords: Proper Noun; Love Affair; Christian Doctrine; Secondary Meaning; Shadow Side

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