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The Laws of LoveDelicts of Desire

The Laws of Love: Delicts of Desire [The Edicts of Love proclaimed that nonchalance or lack of concern was the primary wrong in matters of the heart. The initial application of that principle came, as we saw, in the domain of words. Rhetorical injustices, abusive words — cacozelia — would prevent liaisons being formed, or would undermine and harm amorous affairs in progress. Purloined letters, false reports, corruption of messages, and malicious rumors all intruded upon the rhetorical space across which erotic communication took place and the love affair became a possibility. Slander was the first and greatest of amorous harms not only because it wounded the lover purposelessly but also because it threatened the condition of possibility of the love affair. Malice infracted the felicity condition of liaison: the requirement that words be playful and amorous, socially light and emotionally loaded. Formulate it as a principle: the positive duty of the lover is playful and poetic, their words are either erotic or nonchalant. If the latter then they are to be condemned. Plainly enough the same criterion applies to harm by deed or, as in the next case to be discussed, by interposition of the body.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Laws of LoveDelicts of Desire

Part of the Language, Discourse, Society Book Series
The Laws of Love — Sep 30, 2015

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2007
ISBN
978-1-349-28311-8
Pages
97 –108
DOI
10.1057/9780230626539_6
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The Edicts of Love proclaimed that nonchalance or lack of concern was the primary wrong in matters of the heart. The initial application of that principle came, as we saw, in the domain of words. Rhetorical injustices, abusive words — cacozelia — would prevent liaisons being formed, or would undermine and harm amorous affairs in progress. Purloined letters, false reports, corruption of messages, and malicious rumors all intruded upon the rhetorical space across which erotic communication took place and the love affair became a possibility. Slander was the first and greatest of amorous harms not only because it wounded the lover purposelessly but also because it threatened the condition of possibility of the love affair. Malice infracted the felicity condition of liaison: the requirement that words be playful and amorous, socially light and emotionally loaded. Formulate it as a principle: the positive duty of the lover is playful and poetic, their words are either erotic or nonchalant. If the latter then they are to be condemned. Plainly enough the same criterion applies to harm by deed or, as in the next case to be discussed, by interposition of the body.]

Published: Sep 30, 2015

Keywords: Positive Duty; Love Affair; Felicity Condition; Practical Joke; Amorous Motive

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