The influence of ration level on growth and statolith increment width of the tropical squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana (Cephalopoda: Loliginidae): an experimental approach

The influence of ration level on growth and statolith increment width of the tropical squid... Juvenile squids were grown in individual 2.6-l floating enclosures and were fed either a high- or a low-ration diet of fish and the crustacean Acetes. Squids were maintained for a maximum of 44 days in two experiments. The high-ration individuals reached a significantly larger size in both experiments (27, 25.5 mm mean mantle length, ML) compared to their low-ration siblings (19 mm mean ML) in both experiments. The statolith increment widths prior to the start of the experiment were significantly wider (between 3 and 4 μm) compared to the increment widths after the start of the experiment (between 2 and 3 μm) both for the low- and the high-ration squids. High-ration squids also had significantly wider increments and larger statoliths than their low-ration siblings. Even though we detected consistent trends in daily statolith increment widths for the different feeding regimes, we could not detect variation in increment widths at a daily level of resolution (i.e. as a result of differences in day-to-day food intake at an individual level). This was probably due to the relatively consistent diet experienced by each individual. These experiments revealed that ration level influences squid growth rate, statolith size and daily statolith increment width. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine Biology Springer Journals

The influence of ration level on growth and statolith increment width of the tropical squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana (Cephalopoda: Loliginidae): an experimental approach

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Abstract

Juvenile squids were grown in individual 2.6-l floating enclosures and were fed either a high- or a low-ration diet of fish and the crustacean Acetes. Squids were maintained for a maximum of 44 days in two experiments. The high-ration individuals reached a significantly larger size in both experiments (27, 25.5 mm mean mantle length, ML) compared to their low-ration siblings (19 mm mean ML) in both experiments. The statolith increment widths prior to the start of the experiment were significantly wider (between 3 and 4 μm) compared to the increment widths after the start of the experiment (between 2 and 3 μm) both for the low- and the high-ration squids. High-ration squids also had significantly wider increments and larger statoliths than their low-ration siblings. Even though we detected consistent trends in daily statolith increment widths for the different feeding regimes, we could not detect variation in increment widths at a daily level of resolution (i.e. as a result of differences in day-to-day food intake at an individual level). This was probably due to the relatively consistent diet experienced by each individual. These experiments revealed that ration level influences squid growth rate, statolith size and daily statolith increment width.

Journal

Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 23, 2001

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