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The harem fantasy in nineteenth-century Orientalist paintings

The harem fantasy in nineteenth-century Orientalist paintings This article examines Orientalist cultural production through an overview of the literature on Orientalist paintings produced by European artists in the nineteenth century. There is a particular emphasis on gender and sexuality, and the use of depictions of gender and sexuality to undergird the political project of colonialism. Furthermore, these historical depictions continue to provide the symbolic vernacular for contemporary representations of Muslims that have their own political uses in the era of the War on Terror. This overview illuminates the emergence of representations of Muslims in fine art for European audiences beginning in the twelfth century, and the changes those depictions undergo later on in the nineteenth century as the political relationship between “East” and “West” shifts. The piece also takes into account gender in relationship to the act of authoring these representations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dialectical Anthropology Springer Journals

The harem fantasy in nineteenth-century Orientalist paintings

Dialectical Anthropology , Volume 39 (1) – Feb 25, 2015

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Social Sciences, general; Anthropology
ISSN
0304-4092
eISSN
1573-0786
DOI
10.1007/s10624-015-9372-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article examines Orientalist cultural production through an overview of the literature on Orientalist paintings produced by European artists in the nineteenth century. There is a particular emphasis on gender and sexuality, and the use of depictions of gender and sexuality to undergird the political project of colonialism. Furthermore, these historical depictions continue to provide the symbolic vernacular for contemporary representations of Muslims that have their own political uses in the era of the War on Terror. This overview illuminates the emergence of representations of Muslims in fine art for European audiences beginning in the twelfth century, and the changes those depictions undergo later on in the nineteenth century as the political relationship between “East” and “West” shifts. The piece also takes into account gender in relationship to the act of authoring these representations.

Journal

Dialectical AnthropologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 25, 2015

References