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The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”An Essay on the Best System of Liberal Education, Adapted to the Genius of the Government of the United States. Comprehending Also, an Uniform, General Plan for Instituting and Conducting Public Schools, in this Country, on the Principles of the Most Extensive Utility

The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”: An Essay on the Best System of Liberal... [The Reverend Samuel Knox (1756–1832) was born in County Armagh, Ireland, the son of poor farmers. He studied in Dublin, married, and had four children before emigrating to Bladensburg, Maryland, in 1786. There he worked as a master at the local grammar school, publishing poetry in the Maryland Gazette and Baltimore Advertiser and Matthew Carey’s American Museum. In 1789 he enrolled at the University of Glasgow, Scotland, where he earned his MA and received awards for his outstanding scholarship in translation and Latin composition. From 1792 to 1795, Knox moved to Belfast, Ireland, where he received his minister’s license from the Belfast Presbytery and preached for a year. He returned to Maryland to work as a minister, while taking the position of head of Frederick Academy from 1797 to 1803. Knox had a penchant for political and religious controversy and, by some accounts, an overbearing personality. After resigning from Frederick Academy, he continued to find work as a supply (interim) minister, publish controversial statements, and for a time, cofounded and presided over the Baltimore College. Just as the college was folding, Thomas Jefferson considered Knox for a founding position at the College (later University) of Virginia in 1817 as “Professor of Languages, Belles Lettres, Rhetoric, History and Geography,” at a princely salary. Unfortunately for Knox, by the time he heard of the offer, Jefferson had moved on.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”An Essay on the Best System of Liberal Education, Adapted to the Genius of the Government of the United States. Comprehending Also, an Uniform, General Plan for Instituting and Conducting Public Schools, in this Country, on the Principles of the Most Extensive Utility

Part of the Historical Studies in Education Book Series
Editors: Justice, Benjamin

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2013
ISBN
978-1-349-44453-3
Pages
219 –232
DOI
10.1057/9781137271020_13
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The Reverend Samuel Knox (1756–1832) was born in County Armagh, Ireland, the son of poor farmers. He studied in Dublin, married, and had four children before emigrating to Bladensburg, Maryland, in 1786. There he worked as a master at the local grammar school, publishing poetry in the Maryland Gazette and Baltimore Advertiser and Matthew Carey’s American Museum. In 1789 he enrolled at the University of Glasgow, Scotland, where he earned his MA and received awards for his outstanding scholarship in translation and Latin composition. From 1792 to 1795, Knox moved to Belfast, Ireland, where he received his minister’s license from the Belfast Presbytery and preached for a year. He returned to Maryland to work as a minister, while taking the position of head of Frederick Academy from 1797 to 1803. Knox had a penchant for political and religious controversy and, by some accounts, an overbearing personality. After resigning from Frederick Academy, he continued to find work as a supply (interim) minister, publish controversial statements, and for a time, cofounded and presided over the Baltimore College. Just as the college was folding, Thomas Jefferson considered Knox for a founding position at the College (later University) of Virginia in 1817 as “Professor of Languages, Belles Lettres, Rhetoric, History and Geography,” at a princely salary. Unfortunately for Knox, by the time he heard of the offer, Jefferson had moved on.]

Published: Nov 14, 2015

Keywords: Primary School; Public Education; Literary Instruction; Liberal Education; Uniform System

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