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The European Legislation on AI: a Brief Analysis of its Philosophical Approach

The European Legislation on AI: a Brief Analysis of its Philosophical Approach Philosophy & Technology (2021) 34:215–222 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13347-021-00460-9 EDITOR LE T TER The European Legislation on AI: a Brief Analysis of its Philosophical Approach 1,2 Luciano Floridi Received: 23 May 2021 / Accepted: 23 May 2021 / Published online: 3 June 2021 © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V. 2021 Some European legislation on artificial intelligence (AI) had been expected at least since 16 July 2019. On that date, Ursula von der Leyen had pledged that, within 100 days of her election as President of the European Commission, she would have proposed new legislation on AI. At that time, I remarked that it was a reasonable strategy but an unrealistic timeline. The High-Level Expert Group on AI (HLEG, of which I was a member), organised by the European Commission, had only recently published its Ethics Guidelines for Trustworthy AI (HLEGAI, 2019) and its Policy and Investment Recommendations for Trustworthy AI (HLEGAI, 2019). It seemed evident that the next step would have been the translation of those guidelines and recommendations into a legal framework (Floridi, 2019a). However, the work car- ried out by the HLEG had also shown that the road ahead was going to be long and laborious. I figured it would have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy & Technology Springer Journals

The European Legislation on AI: a Brief Analysis of its Philosophical Approach

Philosophy & Technology , Volume 34 (2) – Jun 3, 2021

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V. 2021
ISSN
2210-5433
eISSN
2210-5441
DOI
10.1007/s13347-021-00460-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Philosophy & Technology (2021) 34:215–222 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13347-021-00460-9 EDITOR LE T TER The European Legislation on AI: a Brief Analysis of its Philosophical Approach 1,2 Luciano Floridi Received: 23 May 2021 / Accepted: 23 May 2021 / Published online: 3 June 2021 © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V. 2021 Some European legislation on artificial intelligence (AI) had been expected at least since 16 July 2019. On that date, Ursula von der Leyen had pledged that, within 100 days of her election as President of the European Commission, she would have proposed new legislation on AI. At that time, I remarked that it was a reasonable strategy but an unrealistic timeline. The High-Level Expert Group on AI (HLEG, of which I was a member), organised by the European Commission, had only recently published its Ethics Guidelines for Trustworthy AI (HLEGAI, 2019) and its Policy and Investment Recommendations for Trustworthy AI (HLEGAI, 2019). It seemed evident that the next step would have been the translation of those guidelines and recommendations into a legal framework (Floridi, 2019a). However, the work car- ried out by the HLEG had also shown that the road ahead was going to be long and laborious. I figured it would have

Journal

Philosophy & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 3, 2021

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