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The Ethics of Biomedical ‘Big Data’ Analytics

The Ethics of Biomedical ‘Big Data’ Analytics Philosophy & Technology (2019) 32:17–21 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13347-019-00344-z EDITORIAL NOTES Brent Mittelstadt Published online: 8 March 2019 Springer Nature B.V. 2019 1 Introduction: The Ethics of Biomedical Data Analytics In modern information societies, individuals generate streams of diverse and potentially valuable data. Digital technologies now easily and routinely record data about the behaviours and preferences of individuals at an unprecedented scale. Analytic tech- niques to make sense of this glut of data have grown in parallel, ushering in what some have called the age of ‘Big Data’. Data analytics at scale provide huge opportunities to improve private and public life, especially in the health sector. In biomedical research and development, the analysis of large datasets (or ‘Biomedical Big Data’; henceforth BBD) has become a major driver of innovation and success, with partnerships between private data-intensive firms and public health bodies increasingly common (Powles and Hodson 2017). Potentially insightful health-related data can now be generated via social media applications and health platforms (Lupton 2014; Costa 2014), emerging ‘personal health monitoring’ technologies (Mittelstadt et al. 2014), home sensors (Niemeijer et al. 2010) and smart phone applications, and online forums and search queries. These new data sources complement traditional repositories consisting of aggregated clinical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy & Technology Springer Journals

The Ethics of Biomedical ‘Big Data’ Analytics

Philosophy & Technology , Volume 32 (1) – Mar 8, 2019

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer Nature B.V.
Subject
Philosophy; Philosophy of Technology
ISSN
2210-5433
eISSN
2210-5441
DOI
10.1007/s13347-019-00344-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Philosophy & Technology (2019) 32:17–21 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13347-019-00344-z EDITORIAL NOTES Brent Mittelstadt Published online: 8 March 2019 Springer Nature B.V. 2019 1 Introduction: The Ethics of Biomedical Data Analytics In modern information societies, individuals generate streams of diverse and potentially valuable data. Digital technologies now easily and routinely record data about the behaviours and preferences of individuals at an unprecedented scale. Analytic tech- niques to make sense of this glut of data have grown in parallel, ushering in what some have called the age of ‘Big Data’. Data analytics at scale provide huge opportunities to improve private and public life, especially in the health sector. In biomedical research and development, the analysis of large datasets (or ‘Biomedical Big Data’; henceforth BBD) has become a major driver of innovation and success, with partnerships between private data-intensive firms and public health bodies increasingly common (Powles and Hodson 2017). Potentially insightful health-related data can now be generated via social media applications and health platforms (Lupton 2014; Costa 2014), emerging ‘personal health monitoring’ technologies (Mittelstadt et al. 2014), home sensors (Niemeijer et al. 2010) and smart phone applications, and online forums and search queries. These new data sources complement traditional repositories consisting of aggregated clinical

Journal

Philosophy & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 8, 2019

References