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The effects of posture on mind wandering

The effects of posture on mind wandering Using a reading comprehension task, we explored whether body postures would influence mind wandering, a universal internally self-generated activity. Specifically, participants were instructed to perform a reading comprehension task under three postural conditions (lying supine, sitting, and standing upright). Probe-caught technique with prompts presented at irregular intervals was adapted to measure the frequency of mind wandering. Self-caught method was used to measure the meta-awareness of mind wandering by self-reports. Results indicated that the radio of mind wandering was significantly greater in lying than standing and sitting, but the meta-awareness of it was not different among three postures. Moreover, the reading performance, an indirect indicator of executive control, decreased in lying compared to standing and sitting. We suggested that the increase of mind wandering in lying posture may due to the dysfunction of executive control, which also results in the redistribution of cognitive resources. Suggestions for future research are proposed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Research Springer Journals

The effects of posture on mind wandering

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2021
ISSN
0340-0727
eISSN
1430-2772
DOI
10.1007/s00426-021-01531-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using a reading comprehension task, we explored whether body postures would influence mind wandering, a universal internally self-generated activity. Specifically, participants were instructed to perform a reading comprehension task under three postural conditions (lying supine, sitting, and standing upright). Probe-caught technique with prompts presented at irregular intervals was adapted to measure the frequency of mind wandering. Self-caught method was used to measure the meta-awareness of mind wandering by self-reports. Results indicated that the radio of mind wandering was significantly greater in lying than standing and sitting, but the meta-awareness of it was not different among three postures. Moreover, the reading performance, an indirect indicator of executive control, decreased in lying compared to standing and sitting. We suggested that the increase of mind wandering in lying posture may due to the dysfunction of executive control, which also results in the redistribution of cognitive resources. Suggestions for future research are proposed.

Journal

Psychological ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: May 21, 2021

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