The effects of cigarettes of varying yield on rapid information processing performance

The effects of cigarettes of varying yield on rapid information processing performance 213 82 82 4 4 K. Wesnes D. M. Warburton Department of Psychology University of Reading RG6 2AL Reading UK Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of four cigarettes having a range of covarying nicotine and “tar” yields on the performance of a rapid information processing task. Twenty five smokers were tested on different days with each of the cigarettes and in a non-smoking control condition. The order of testing was counterbalanced over days using a 5×5 Latin Square Design. Not only did smoking help to prevent the decrease in speed and accuracy which occurred over time in the non-smoking conditions, but it actually improved performance over baseline levels. Furthermore, the greatest improvements were found with the higher nicotine yielding cigarttes. These objectively measured effects of the cigarettes on performance matched the subjective evaluations of the effects of the cigarettes outside the laboratory, and are discussed in relation to other questionnaire studies and a survey of smoking at work. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

The effects of cigarettes of varying yield on rapid information processing performance

Psychopharmacology, Volume 82 (4) – Mar 1, 1984

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
DOI
10.1007/BF00427682
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

213 82 82 4 4 K. Wesnes D. M. Warburton Department of Psychology University of Reading RG6 2AL Reading UK Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of four cigarettes having a range of covarying nicotine and “tar” yields on the performance of a rapid information processing task. Twenty five smokers were tested on different days with each of the cigarettes and in a non-smoking control condition. The order of testing was counterbalanced over days using a 5×5 Latin Square Design. Not only did smoking help to prevent the decrease in speed and accuracy which occurred over time in the non-smoking conditions, but it actually improved performance over baseline levels. Furthermore, the greatest improvements were found with the higher nicotine yielding cigarttes. These objectively measured effects of the cigarettes on performance matched the subjective evaluations of the effects of the cigarettes outside the laboratory, and are discussed in relation to other questionnaire studies and a survey of smoking at work.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 1984

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