The effect of vapor pressure on stomatal control of gas exchange in Douglas fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii ) saplings

The effect of vapor pressure on stomatal control of gas exchange in Douglas fir ( Pseudotsuga... Increasing leaf to air vapor pressure deficit (VPD) caused reductions in stomatal conductance of both current year and previous season needles of Pseudotsuga menziesii saplings. The stomata of current year needles were found to be more responsive to changes in VPD than those of previous season needles. The reductions in stomatal conductance of current year needles were not associated with decreases in xylem pressure potential. In fact, the reductions in stomatal conductance of current year needles were sometimes sufficient to reduce transpiration and thus raise xylem pressure potential even though VPD was increasing. There was a decline in stomatal responsiveness to VPD in current year needles between early and late summer. Pressure-volume curves determined for different age needles at different times of the year suggested that differences and changes in stomatal responsiveness to VPD may have been caused in part by differences and changes in needle water potential components. Hexane washes of current year needles during the late summer succeeded in partially restoring their VPD sensitivity, suggesting that changes in the water permeability of the external cuticle during needle maturation may also have played a role in causing the summer decline in VPD responsiveness. In both current and previous year needles VPD-induced changes in stomatal conductance had a greater relative effect on transpiration ( q w ) than on net photosynthesis (Ph N ). In maturing needles the ratio of the sensitivities of transpiration and net photosynthesis to changes in stomatal conductance, (∂ q w /∂ g s )/∂Ph N /∂ g s ), remained nearly constant as VPD was varied. This provides experimental support for a recent hypothesis that stomata respond to environmental fluctuations in such a manner as to maintain the above ratio constant, which optimizes CO 2 uptake with respect to water loss. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

The effect of vapor pressure on stomatal control of gas exchange in Douglas fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii ) saplings

Oecologia, Volume 54 (2) – Aug 1, 1982

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/the-effect-of-vapor-pressure-on-stomatal-control-of-gas-exchange-in-GURcrFykON
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00378398
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Increasing leaf to air vapor pressure deficit (VPD) caused reductions in stomatal conductance of both current year and previous season needles of Pseudotsuga menziesii saplings. The stomata of current year needles were found to be more responsive to changes in VPD than those of previous season needles. The reductions in stomatal conductance of current year needles were not associated with decreases in xylem pressure potential. In fact, the reductions in stomatal conductance of current year needles were sometimes sufficient to reduce transpiration and thus raise xylem pressure potential even though VPD was increasing. There was a decline in stomatal responsiveness to VPD in current year needles between early and late summer. Pressure-volume curves determined for different age needles at different times of the year suggested that differences and changes in stomatal responsiveness to VPD may have been caused in part by differences and changes in needle water potential components. Hexane washes of current year needles during the late summer succeeded in partially restoring their VPD sensitivity, suggesting that changes in the water permeability of the external cuticle during needle maturation may also have played a role in causing the summer decline in VPD responsiveness. In both current and previous year needles VPD-induced changes in stomatal conductance had a greater relative effect on transpiration ( q w ) than on net photosynthesis (Ph N ). In maturing needles the ratio of the sensitivities of transpiration and net photosynthesis to changes in stomatal conductance, (∂ q w /∂ g s )/∂Ph N /∂ g s ), remained nearly constant as VPD was varied. This provides experimental support for a recent hypothesis that stomata respond to environmental fluctuations in such a manner as to maintain the above ratio constant, which optimizes CO 2 uptake with respect to water loss.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 1982

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off