The development and distribution of the cranial neural crest in the rat embryo

The development and distribution of the cranial neural crest in the rat embryo The head region of rat embryos was investigated by scanning electron microscopy after removal of the surface ectoderm with adhesive tape. Observations were made in embryos from 6-somite to 11-somite stages of development, in order to determine: (1) the sequence of emigration of neural crest cells from the different regions of the future brain; (2) the appearance of crest cells before, during, and after their conversion from an epithelial to a mesenchymal form; (3) the migration pathways. Emigration occurs first from the midbrain, and next from the rostral hindbrain; crest cells from these two regions migrate into the first visceral arch. Subsequently cells emigrate from the caudal hindbrain, but not in a rostrocaudal sequence. At the time of crest cell emigration, the neural fold morphology varies from a slightly convex, widely open plate (midbrain) to a closed tube (caudal hindbrain). Thus the timing of emigration is related neither to age (as reflected in rostrocaudal levels) nor to morphology of the neural epithelium. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cell and Tissue Research Springer Journals

The development and distribution of the cranial neural crest in the rat embryo

Cell and Tissue Research, Volume 240 (2) – May 1, 1985

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/the-development-and-distribution-of-the-cranial-neural-crest-in-the-61FDHg6rqw
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Endocrinology; Neurology; Cell Biology
ISSN
0302-766X
eISSN
1432-0878
DOI
10.1007/BF00222353
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The head region of rat embryos was investigated by scanning electron microscopy after removal of the surface ectoderm with adhesive tape. Observations were made in embryos from 6-somite to 11-somite stages of development, in order to determine: (1) the sequence of emigration of neural crest cells from the different regions of the future brain; (2) the appearance of crest cells before, during, and after their conversion from an epithelial to a mesenchymal form; (3) the migration pathways. Emigration occurs first from the midbrain, and next from the rostral hindbrain; crest cells from these two regions migrate into the first visceral arch. Subsequently cells emigrate from the caudal hindbrain, but not in a rostrocaudal sequence. At the time of crest cell emigration, the neural fold morphology varies from a slightly convex, widely open plate (midbrain) to a closed tube (caudal hindbrain). Thus the timing of emigration is related neither to age (as reflected in rostrocaudal levels) nor to morphology of the neural epithelium.

Journal

Cell and Tissue ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: May 1, 1985

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off