The contribution of crassulacean acid metabolism to the annual productivity of two aquatic vascular plants

The contribution of crassulacean acid metabolism to the annual productivity of two aquatic... Net annual productivity and annual carbon budgets were determined for populations of Littorella uniflora var. americana and Isoetes macrospora in a mesotrophic and oligotrophic lake in northern Wisconsin, to assess the contribution of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) to annual productivity of the species in their natural environment. Nocturnal carbon accumulation (CAM), daytime uptake of external CO 2 via the C 3 mechanism, and refixation of endogenously generated CO 2 from daytime respiration were the sources of carbon income. CAM activity as diurnal acid rhythms reached maxima of 89 to 182 μeq·g -1 leaf fresh weight for the various populations. Maximum rates of daytime 14 C uptake ranged from 0.56 to 1.46 mg C·g -1 leaf dry wt.·h -1 for the study populations. Refixation of daytime respired CO 2 averaged 37% for the four populations. Carbon loss was due largely to “dark” respiration, during the day and night. Nocturnal carbon accumulation, daytime CO 2 uptake and 24-h dark respiration were of similar magnitude, indicating dark respiration was equivalent to ∼50% of gross photosynthesis. Net annual production was measured for each population by following leaf turnover. Turnover rates for the Littorella populations were 1.56 and 1.72·yr -1 , and for the Isoetes populations, 0.85 and 1.00·yr -1 . Measured net annual productivity and calculated net annual productivity (based on carbon exchange) agreed within an average of 12% for the four populations. While CAM activity was greater for the more productive population of each species, the results suggest that the contribution of CAM to annual productivity is greater for the less productive population of each species. CAM contributed 45 to 55% of the annual carbon gain for the study populations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

The contribution of crassulacean acid metabolism to the annual productivity of two aquatic vascular plants

Oecologia, Volume 68 (4) – Mar 1, 1986

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/the-contribution-of-crassulacean-acid-metabolism-to-the-annual-uMdmlLKi0t
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
DOI
10.1007/BF00378781
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Net annual productivity and annual carbon budgets were determined for populations of Littorella uniflora var. americana and Isoetes macrospora in a mesotrophic and oligotrophic lake in northern Wisconsin, to assess the contribution of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) to annual productivity of the species in their natural environment. Nocturnal carbon accumulation (CAM), daytime uptake of external CO 2 via the C 3 mechanism, and refixation of endogenously generated CO 2 from daytime respiration were the sources of carbon income. CAM activity as diurnal acid rhythms reached maxima of 89 to 182 μeq·g -1 leaf fresh weight for the various populations. Maximum rates of daytime 14 C uptake ranged from 0.56 to 1.46 mg C·g -1 leaf dry wt.·h -1 for the study populations. Refixation of daytime respired CO 2 averaged 37% for the four populations. Carbon loss was due largely to “dark” respiration, during the day and night. Nocturnal carbon accumulation, daytime CO 2 uptake and 24-h dark respiration were of similar magnitude, indicating dark respiration was equivalent to ∼50% of gross photosynthesis. Net annual production was measured for each population by following leaf turnover. Turnover rates for the Littorella populations were 1.56 and 1.72·yr -1 , and for the Isoetes populations, 0.85 and 1.00·yr -1 . Measured net annual productivity and calculated net annual productivity (based on carbon exchange) agreed within an average of 12% for the four populations. While CAM activity was greater for the more productive population of each species, the results suggest that the contribution of CAM to annual productivity is greater for the less productive population of each species. CAM contributed 45 to 55% of the annual carbon gain for the study populations.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 1986

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off