The comparative analysis of species occurrence patterns on archipelagos

The comparative analysis of species occurrence patterns on archipelagos We present a technique based on recent developments in contingency table analysis to analyze species occurrence patterns on archipelagos. This technique, through a “logistic” transformation, fits a sigmoidal-shaped surface on the species presence-absence matrix using only three parameters. This technique does not follow from any a priori or theoretical motivation, but is simply a descriptive statistical procedure. It accounts for roughly half the variation of the empirical contingency matrices for 14 different island systems. The taxa studied included plants, birds, herps and mammals. The matrix technique for a set of species in an archipelago provides three biologically relevant summary statistics. The first statistic indicates the overall colonizing success of the species in the archipelago. The second statistic describes the orderedness of the matrix (species occurrences). The third indicates the distribution of colonizing success between species. The technique is useful in computing the range of these statistics across taxa and over archipelagos. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

The comparative analysis of species occurrence patterns on archipelagos

Oecologia, Volume 73 (2) – Sep 1, 1987

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/the-comparative-analysis-of-species-occurrence-patterns-on-ug7nqn7NKE
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
DOI
10.1007/BF00377519
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We present a technique based on recent developments in contingency table analysis to analyze species occurrence patterns on archipelagos. This technique, through a “logistic” transformation, fits a sigmoidal-shaped surface on the species presence-absence matrix using only three parameters. This technique does not follow from any a priori or theoretical motivation, but is simply a descriptive statistical procedure. It accounts for roughly half the variation of the empirical contingency matrices for 14 different island systems. The taxa studied included plants, birds, herps and mammals. The matrix technique for a set of species in an archipelago provides three biologically relevant summary statistics. The first statistic indicates the overall colonizing success of the species in the archipelago. The second statistic describes the orderedness of the matrix (species occurrences). The third indicates the distribution of colonizing success between species. The technique is useful in computing the range of these statistics across taxa and over archipelagos.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 1, 1987

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month