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The Balkan ProspectRepetition, Agency

The Balkan Prospect: Repetition, Agency [Writing at the time of armed hostilities between Georgia and Russia in the summer of 2008, the political commentator, Fareed Zakaria (2008), tried to allay fears of a new Cold War by arguing that “history does not repeat itself. It only seems to do so to people who don’t know the details.” Those who understand the specificities of the present against the historical past are protected against “making bad analogies.” At first glance, this seems like sound advice. Few would argue against the disciplined gathering of details since the “devil is in the details,” as Abby Warburg famously said. However, too many details often prove debilitating and drive obstructionist politics. In this case, Zakaria argued that the conflict needed to be viewed through the prism, not of the Cold War, but of globalization. In effect, he was arguing that the pertinent details emerge in the large geopolitical paradigms that provide the right context for their interpretation. Some might counter that this perspective amounts to a dangerous leap of faith, which compromises the specificities of details that inform the less heady but no less significant realm of micropolitics.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Balkan ProspectRepetition, Agency

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Vangelis Calotychos 2013
ISBN
978-1-349-45092-3
Pages
59 –91
DOI
10.1057/9781137336804_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Writing at the time of armed hostilities between Georgia and Russia in the summer of 2008, the political commentator, Fareed Zakaria (2008), tried to allay fears of a new Cold War by arguing that “history does not repeat itself. It only seems to do so to people who don’t know the details.” Those who understand the specificities of the present against the historical past are protected against “making bad analogies.” At first glance, this seems like sound advice. Few would argue against the disciplined gathering of details since the “devil is in the details,” as Abby Warburg famously said. However, too many details often prove debilitating and drive obstructionist politics. In this case, Zakaria argued that the conflict needed to be viewed through the prism, not of the Cold War, but of globalization. In effect, he was arguing that the pertinent details emerge in the large geopolitical paradigms that provide the right context for their interpretation. Some might counter that this perspective amounts to a dangerous leap of faith, which compromises the specificities of details that inform the less heady but no less significant realm of micropolitics.]

Published: Mar 23, 2016

Keywords: Traumatic Repetition; Narrative Discourse; Female Companion; Racial Question; Open Scene

There are no references for this article.