Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Technoscience and Ethics Foresight

Technoscience and Ethics Foresight Philos. Technol. (2014) 27:499–501 DOI 10.1007/s13347-014-0180-9 EDITOR LETTER Luciano Floridi Published online: 7 November 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014 On October 6 and 7, the European Commission, with the participation of Portuguese authorities and the support of the Champalimaud Foundation, organised in Lisbon a high-level conference on “The Future of Europe is Science”. Mr. Barroso, President of the European Commission, opened the meeting. I had the honour of giving one of the keynote addresses. The explicit goal of the conference was twofold. On the one hand, we tried to take stock of European achievements in science, engineering, technology and innovation (SETI) during the last 10 years. On the other hand, we looked into potential future opportunities that SETI may bring to Europe, both in economic terms (growth, jobs, new business opportunities) and in terms of wellbeing (individual welfare and higher social standards). One of the most interesting aspects of the meeting was the presentation of the latest report on “The Future of Europe is Science” by the President’s Science and Technology 3 4 Advisory Council (STAC). The report addresses some very big questions: How will we keep healthy? How will we live, learn, work and interact in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy & Technology Springer Journals

Technoscience and Ethics Foresight

Philosophy & Technology , Volume 27 (4) – Nov 7, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/technoscience-and-ethics-foresight-qOo1izYGCW
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Philosophy; Philosophy of Technology
ISSN
2210-5433
eISSN
2210-5441
DOI
10.1007/s13347-014-0180-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Philos. Technol. (2014) 27:499–501 DOI 10.1007/s13347-014-0180-9 EDITOR LETTER Luciano Floridi Published online: 7 November 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014 On October 6 and 7, the European Commission, with the participation of Portuguese authorities and the support of the Champalimaud Foundation, organised in Lisbon a high-level conference on “The Future of Europe is Science”. Mr. Barroso, President of the European Commission, opened the meeting. I had the honour of giving one of the keynote addresses. The explicit goal of the conference was twofold. On the one hand, we tried to take stock of European achievements in science, engineering, technology and innovation (SETI) during the last 10 years. On the other hand, we looked into potential future opportunities that SETI may bring to Europe, both in economic terms (growth, jobs, new business opportunities) and in terms of wellbeing (individual welfare and higher social standards). One of the most interesting aspects of the meeting was the presentation of the latest report on “The Future of Europe is Science” by the President’s Science and Technology 3 4 Advisory Council (STAC). The report addresses some very big questions: How will we keep healthy? How will we live, learn, work and interact in the

Journal

Philosophy & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 7, 2014

There are no references for this article.