Systemic or intrahippocampal cannabinoid administration impairs spatial memory in rats

Systemic or intrahippocampal cannabinoid administration impairs spatial memory in rats 213 119 119 3 3 A. H. Lichtman K. R. Dimen B. R. Martin Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology MCV Station Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University Box 613 23298 Richmond VA USA Abstract The purpose of the present study was to investigate the disruptive effects of cannabinoids on working memory as assessed in the eight-arm radial-maze. Systemic administration of Δ 9 -THC, WIN-55,212-2, and CP-55,940 increased the number of errors committed in the radial-maze. CP-55,940 was the most potent cannabinoid in impairing memory (ED 50 =0.13 mg/kg). Δ 9 -THC and WIN-55,212-2 disrupted mazechoice accuracy at equipotent doses (ED 50 values =2.1 and 2.2 mg/kg, respectively). In addition, systemic administration of each of these agents retarded completion time. Whereas the doses of Δ 9 -THC and CP-55,940 required to retard maze performance were higher than those needed to increase error numbers, WIN-55,212-2 was equipotent in both of these measures. On the other hand, neither anandamide, the putative endogenous cannabinoid ligand, nor cannabidiol, an inactive naturally occurring cannabinoid, had any apparent effects on memory. A second aim of this study was to elucidate the neuroanatomical substrates mediating the disruptive effects of cannabinoids on memory. Intrahippocampal injections of CP-55,940 impaired maze performance in a dose-dependent manner (ED 50 =8 µg/rat), but did not retard the amount of time required to complete the maze. The effects of intrahippocampal CP-55,940 were apparently specific to cognition because no other cannabinoid pharmacological effects (e.g., antinociception, hypothermia, and catalepsy) were detected. This dissociation between choice accuracy in the radial-maze and other cannabinoid pharmacological effects suggests that the working memory deficits produced by cannabinoids may be mediated by cannabinoid receptors in the hippocampus. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Systemic or intrahippocampal cannabinoid administration impairs spatial memory in rats

Psychopharmacology, Volume 119 (3) – Jun 1, 1995

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF02246292
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

213 119 119 3 3 A. H. Lichtman K. R. Dimen B. R. Martin Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology MCV Station Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University Box 613 23298 Richmond VA USA Abstract The purpose of the present study was to investigate the disruptive effects of cannabinoids on working memory as assessed in the eight-arm radial-maze. Systemic administration of Δ 9 -THC, WIN-55,212-2, and CP-55,940 increased the number of errors committed in the radial-maze. CP-55,940 was the most potent cannabinoid in impairing memory (ED 50 =0.13 mg/kg). Δ 9 -THC and WIN-55,212-2 disrupted mazechoice accuracy at equipotent doses (ED 50 values =2.1 and 2.2 mg/kg, respectively). In addition, systemic administration of each of these agents retarded completion time. Whereas the doses of Δ 9 -THC and CP-55,940 required to retard maze performance were higher than those needed to increase error numbers, WIN-55,212-2 was equipotent in both of these measures. On the other hand, neither anandamide, the putative endogenous cannabinoid ligand, nor cannabidiol, an inactive naturally occurring cannabinoid, had any apparent effects on memory. A second aim of this study was to elucidate the neuroanatomical substrates mediating the disruptive effects of cannabinoids on memory. Intrahippocampal injections of CP-55,940 impaired maze performance in a dose-dependent manner (ED 50 =8 µg/rat), but did not retard the amount of time required to complete the maze. The effects of intrahippocampal CP-55,940 were apparently specific to cognition because no other cannabinoid pharmacological effects (e.g., antinociception, hypothermia, and catalepsy) were detected. This dissociation between choice accuracy in the radial-maze and other cannabinoid pharmacological effects suggests that the working memory deficits produced by cannabinoids may be mediated by cannabinoid receptors in the hippocampus.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 1995

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