Subjective effects of cigarette smoking in adolescents

Subjective effects of cigarette smoking in adolescents 213 92 92 1 1 A. D. McNeill M. Jarvis R. West Addiction Research Unit Institute of Psychiatry 101, Denmark Hill SE5 8AF London UK Abstract Eighty-two per cent of a sample of 170 female adolescent smokers reported experiencing one or more of five specified subjective effects of smoking. Feeling calmer was the most frequently reported effect and daily smokers were more likely to report this than non-daily smokers (64% versus 38%, P <0.001). Self-reports of cigarette consumption and depth of inhalation and measures of smoke intake (salivary cotinine and expired-air carbon monoxide levels) were positively related to the report of feeling calmer when smoking and negatively related to feeling dizzy/light-headed and sick when smoking. The likelihood of experiencing at least one withdrawal effect when trying to quit was greater amongst those who reported feeling calmer when smoking (82% versus 40%, P <0.001). These results indicate that subjective effects of smoking are commonly reported by children and it is possible that pharmacological factors are implicated alongside psychosocial ones even at this early stage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Subjective effects of cigarette smoking in adolescents

Psychopharmacology, Volume 92 (1) – May 1, 1987

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
DOI
10.1007/BF00215490
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

213 92 92 1 1 A. D. McNeill M. Jarvis R. West Addiction Research Unit Institute of Psychiatry 101, Denmark Hill SE5 8AF London UK Abstract Eighty-two per cent of a sample of 170 female adolescent smokers reported experiencing one or more of five specified subjective effects of smoking. Feeling calmer was the most frequently reported effect and daily smokers were more likely to report this than non-daily smokers (64% versus 38%, P <0.001). Self-reports of cigarette consumption and depth of inhalation and measures of smoke intake (salivary cotinine and expired-air carbon monoxide levels) were positively related to the report of feeling calmer when smoking and negatively related to feeling dizzy/light-headed and sick when smoking. The likelihood of experiencing at least one withdrawal effect when trying to quit was greater amongst those who reported feeling calmer when smoking (82% versus 40%, P <0.001). These results indicate that subjective effects of smoking are commonly reported by children and it is possible that pharmacological factors are implicated alongside psychosocial ones even at this early stage.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: May 1, 1987

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